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A small taste of The Freikorps.


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#1 C.Evans

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Posted 30 July 2002 - 07:28 PM

Bish especially--im teasing you a bit on this but look below.

Some Freikorps units:

Freiwilligen Regiment Reinhard.
Bayerisches Schutzenkorps von Epp. AKA, Freikorps von Epp.
2nd Marine Bde Wilhelmshaven AKA Bde Ehrhardt.
Freikorps Oberland. AKA Freikorps von Medem.
3rd Marine Bde von Lowenfeld.
Freikorps Werdenfels.
Garde Kavallerie Schutzen Division.
Freikorps Bayreuth.

Ill give more tomorrow. ;)
Lost are only those, who abandon themselves) Hans-Ulrich Rudel.
:snoopy: :ww1ace:
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#2 Bish OBE

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Posted 30 July 2002 - 07:30 PM

This could well lead to me doing a Friekorps diorama. Guess i'll have to start looking for some WW1 figures for that.

I've heard of the Ehrhardt Bde. Weren't they involved with the revolt by the German Navy at the end of the war.

[ 30 July 2002, 02:32 PM: Message edited by: Bish OBE ]
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#3 C.Evans

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Posted 31 July 2002 - 07:45 PM

You are quite correct my friend. Also here is a tiny bit more to tease you with--till I have more time--possibly tomorrow.

Freikorps von Oven.
Schutztruppen Regiment 1, von Lettow-Vorbeck-arm.
Minenwerfer Abteilung Heuschkel (Trench mortar Detachment)
Freiwillige Batterie Zenetti (Artillery)
Eiserne Division aka, Freikorps Brussow.

More later. :D
Lost are only those, who abandon themselves) Hans-Ulrich Rudel.
:snoopy: :ww1ace:
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#4 C.Evans

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Posted 02 August 2002 - 08:33 PM

More Freikorps Units.

Baltische Landswehr.
Sturmabteilung Rossbach.
Selbstschutz Battalion Heydebreck.
Freiwillige Russische Westarmee
Selbstschutz Oberschlesian.
Freikorps von Pfeffer.
Freiwilligen Jagerkorps Erlangen.
selbstschutz Battalion Schwarze Schar.
Selbstschutze Battalion Reinchenbach. (Part of Freikorps Hasse).
Selbstschutze Battalion Gogolin.
Freikorps Potsdam.
Selbstschutz Battalion Generalfeldmarschall von Hindenburg.
Lost are only those, who abandon themselves) Hans-Ulrich Rudel.
:snoopy: :ww1ace:
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#5 C.Evans

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Posted 10 August 2002 - 07:33 PM

Still more on the Freikorps......

Here are name of a few other units.....

There are three classes of freikorps units. Class one is: the kind born under revolutionatry circumstances.Each had their own Organizational and structure in its strangth, recources and objectives. Many of these formed and appeared in the first few months of 1919. Some of these lasted only a few weeks before joining another unit forming a larger korps. Many were created to react to s specific threat or a local threat and disbanded when the threat dissappeared.

Class one Freikorps units were mainly recruited by Generals or Colonels, who could field forces from Brigade to Divisional strength. This could have been several thousand men in several units with their own field artillery, engineers and support units. Almost all of these were born from regular Imperial Army units. All of these men were veterans of service in ww1.

Some examples are:

Badishsche Volksheer, Bayerischen Schutzenkorps a.k.a Freikorps von Epp, Deutsche Schutz Division, Garde Kavallerie Schutzen Division, Freiwilligen Abtielung Haas, Freikorps Held, Freiwilligen Landsjagerkorps, Freiwilligen Landschutzenkorps, and Schutztrupp Regiment von Lettow-Vorbeck.

Class two of Freikorps units, were those which were raisedin various cities and regions to defend public order against revolutionary attempts. These were smaller in size than the first group ranging from around 100 men up to 2,000 men.

Most of these men were war veterans, but also there were many in these units that were made up of like-minded civilain volunteers. Most of these added the name of the city or region as the name of their Freikorps unit.

A few examples from hundreds known: Freikorps Bamberg, FK Bayreuth, FK Bodensee, FK Chiemgau, FK Dusseldorf, FK Erlangen, FK Gottingen, FK Halle, FK Hessen, FK Landsberg, FK Munsterland, FKOldenburg, FK Passau, FKRegensburg, FK Schleswig-Holstein, FK Schwaben, FK Thuringen, and FK Wurzburg. Other examples in this catagory which did not have FK in its name are: Wachtabtielung Bahrenfeld, (Bahrenfeld Guard Detachment, from Hamburg) and the Westphalisches Jagerkorps (Westphalian Rifle Corps).

Class three

(Continued when I have more time).
Lost are only those, who abandon themselves) Hans-Ulrich Rudel.
:snoopy: :ww1ace:
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#6 C.Evans

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Posted 12 August 2002 - 11:59 PM

bump
Lost are only those, who abandon themselves) Hans-Ulrich Rudel.
:snoopy: :ww1ace:
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#7 Friedrich

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Posted 16 August 2002 - 01:12 AM

Interesting stuff, Herr Feldmarschall! Danke!
"War is less costly than servitude, the choice is always between Verdun and Dachau." - Jean Dutourd, French veteran of both world wars

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#8 Kai-Petri

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Posted 08 December 2005 - 03:51 PM

Among the most fateful developments which shaped politics in Germany in the aftermath of World War I were the emergence of radical paramilitary organizations on both the extreme right and left as well as the unprecedented level of violence these generated in German political life. One such formation, the clandestine "Organisation Consul," and its terroristic activities, particularly the assassinations of several leading democratic politicians during the early Weimar Republic, is the subject of Martin Sabrow's painstaking and fascinating study.

The O.C. took its mysterious sounding designation from the code-name of its chief, ex-naval captain Hermann Ehrhardt, who first gained notoriety for his participation in the abortive Kapp Putsch of March 1920. The supposed lesson Ehrhardt derived from this initial attempt to overthrow the constitutional order established by the November 1918 revolution was that this goal could only be accomplished if democracy's main supporters, the industrial workingclass, could be convinced that the existing government was unable to defend their interests effectively.

As Sabrow convincingly demonstrates, the O.C., was responsible for the series of bloody crimes committed between August 1921 and June 1922 that at least temporarily shook the struggling democratic system in postwar Germany. The principal victims were the Centre (Catholic) party parliamentarian Matthias Erzberger, who had signed the armistice agreement that signalled the country's catastrophic wartime defeat; Social Democrat Philipp Scheidemann, the prime minister responsible for replacing the monarchy with a republic; and, most spectacularly, Foreign Minister Walther Rathenau, a Jew whose policy of fulfilling the oppressive terms of the Versailles Treaty earned him the hatred of nationalists and anti-Semites alike.

It was mainly the general improvement in Germany's economic condition and international status after 1924/25 that finally led to the demise of the O.C.--that and the rise of the Nazi movement which rejected Ehrhardt's putschism after the fiasco of its own beer-hall coup in November 1923 in favour of "legal" electoral politics.

http://www.findartic...512/ai_n8721676
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