Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Radar coverage in English Channel in 1940


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Ptychodus

Ptychodus

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 01 October 2010 - 10:01 PM

I am trying to find out if there was radar coverage in the English Channel in 1940 that would detect shipping. Obviously there was a good coverage for detecting aircraft, but would the ships of Operation Sea-lion have been detected by radar? references would be good......
Ptychodus

#2 ozjohn39

ozjohn39

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 501 posts

Posted 01 October 2010 - 11:05 PM

Maybe they didn't need it. The RAF was proving daily recon flights of the 'Invasion Ports' on the coast of France.

The german peace-lovers could not scratch themselves without the Brits knowing about it.



John.
"I disagree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it". - Voltaire.

#3 lwd

lwd

    Ace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,255 posts
  • LocationMichigan

Posted 04 October 2010 - 03:32 PM

There were also a lot of patrol craft in the channel both day and night I believe. Both sides operated hundreds of MTBs, armed trawlers, mine layers, etc.

#4 The_Historian

The_Historian

    Pillboxologist

  • TrusteeOKF Trustee
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 13,645 posts
  • LocationStirling, Scotland

Posted 04 October 2010 - 03:36 PM

Pt-
Not really coastal radar as such to start with.
This book will answer every question you might have if you can source a copy-
Building Radar: Forging Britain's Early-warning Chain,1939-45: Amazon.co.uk: Colin Dobinson: Books
Regards,

Gordon

#5 Spartanroller

Spartanroller

    Ace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,620 posts

Posted 04 October 2010 - 04:04 PM

from what I could find there was no dedicated surface scanning radar based on land, but ship mounted sets had been introduced well before the war, and these could have been used. In reality most of the ships equipped with radar were based outside of the channel for the most part, but they did patrol. Coastal command aircraft fitted with ASV radar first had success against U-boats in November 1940, so it is likely they were around a little before that and could easily have been watching the channel;

Atlantic, WW2, convoys, radar, escort carriers, air-gap, U-boats, Liberators

Even the Chain Home (Low) and (Extra Low) stations could not detect surface ships;

Chain Home Extra Low

hope this helps :)
  • brndirt1 likes this
Cheers, Nigel :)

"Ubique" - For the Royal Engineer it means 'Everywhere', For the Royal Artillery 'All over the place'.;)

#6 phylo_roadking

phylo_roadking

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 981 posts

Posted 16 October 2010 - 05:29 PM

Even the Chain Home (Low) and (Extra Low) stations could not detect surface ships


Actually Chain Home Low could detect surface traffic....something I've only learned in the last year from Brian Lavery's We Shall Fight On The Beaches.

As early as 18th June Fighter Command informed its RDF operators that CHL would observe surface traffic. They were ordered to report concentrations of five or more ships to higher authority and to keep watching it while naval liaison officers would check if there was supposed to be friendly traffic in the area. An RN sub-lieutenant was stationed at each CHL station to filter reports to the local Naval command (FO Dover lol). CHL was actually SO sensitive to surface traffic it could detect buoys, even cloud effects on still water!

The Army asked for and received 15 CHL sets for monitoring likely invasion beaches, and by October the RN was asking for 11 more to watch the approaches to major ports in all weathers..

#7 Spartanroller

Spartanroller

    Ace

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,620 posts

Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:06 PM

Very interesting - maybe the conflicting reports are due to developments in the CHL stations over time, and maybe because of secrecy etc.

Thanks :)
Cheers, Nigel :)

"Ubique" - For the Royal Engineer it means 'Everywhere', For the Royal Artillery 'All over the place'.;)

#8 phylo_roadking

phylo_roadking

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 981 posts

Posted 16 October 2010 - 06:24 PM

More likely the specialisation of history postwar; our opinions are necessarily coloured by the sheer bulk of BoB material ;) Lavery's book is the first decently-detailed cross-service history of Sealion preparations I've seen, and is useful for many more suprising insights like this.

#9 Ptychodus

Ptychodus

    recruit

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

Posted 22 March 2012 - 05:26 PM

I'm posting this for two reasons. I think that members might be interested in these radar photographs, and I'd like any identification of the equipment if anyone knows.In the second picture I think there are chain home towers on the extreme left in the distance. They were taken somewhere between Summer 1944 and the end of the War.Attached File  adsettradar06.jpg   77.43KB   3 downloadsIf you need any bigger copies I can supply.Ptych

Attached Files






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users