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Japanese holdouts fought for decades after WWII, read transcript. watch video report..


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#1 sniper1946

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 03:25 PM

Lateline - 12/11/2010: Japanese holdouts fought for decades after WWII
see video story too ...:)

Japanese man Hiroo Onoda continued to fight his own gorilla war for 29 years after World War II, refusing to believe the fight was over.

Transcript

LEIGH SALES, PRESENTER: They were known as the holdouts, Japanese soldiers who refused to surrender after the end of World War II.

Dozens fought on from their jungle strongholds, refusing to believe that the Japanese empire had been defeated.

One of the last to surrender was Hiroo Onoda who spent 30 years waging his own guerrilla war on an island in the Philippines.

He eventually laid down his arms after his former commanding officer returned to the Philippines in 1974 and ordered him to give up.

North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy reports from Tokyo.

Edited by sniper1946, 12 November 2010 - 03:38 PM.


#2 Owen

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 07:51 AM

He's died aged 91.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...d-asia-25772192

#3 ptimms

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 05:09 PM

I'm not too bothered he didn't hold out in life any longer. This unrepentant loon continued to murder long after his murderous comrades went home.


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People of every colour marching side by side
Marching cross these fields where a million fascists died
You're bound to lose, you fascists are bound to lose


#4 A-58

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:15 AM

I wonder if they got back pay?

"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#5 KJ Jr

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:35 PM

I'm not too bothered he didn't hold out in life any longer. This unrepentant loon continued to murder long after his murderous comrades went home.


And he was celebrated as a hero. It's shameful. Was he loyal to a fault, yes. Was he tapped in the head, absolutely.

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#6 George Patton

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:31 AM

I wonder if they got back pay?

 

The Taiwanese holdout who surrendered in 1978 did (after some 'public outrage'), so I would assume that the Lt. did as well.


Best Regards,
Alan


#7 mac_bolan00

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:12 AM

I'm not too bothered he didn't hold out in life any longer. This unrepentant loon continued to murder long after his murderous comrades went home.

 

i think you ought to be more understanding. onoda was a special case. most of the other stragglers knew the war was over and they turned native for reasons like shame, or fear of negative opinion. onoda, on the other hand, waged a guerilla war up to the 70s because those were his expressed orders: to hold out until he was relieved, even if he had to live on coconuts. he was trained in urban and guerilla warfare. he thought the war was still on. he saw news papers that japan was rich and prosperous, so he deduced that the fighting had shifted elsewhere. his old CO had to personally come to the island to read to him his orders to surrender.



#8 mac_bolan00

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:18 AM

And he was celebrated as a hero. It's shameful. Was he loyal to a fault, yes. Was he tapped in the head, absolutely.

 

japan after the surrender was sorely lacking in one thing: a genuine war hero, and onoda happened to fit the bill. no japanese soldier, especially those captured, came home expecting to be treated a hero. they were all afraid that the populace would not forgive them for the defeat. but all received warm welcomes. unlike most of the other hold outs, onoda was an officer; of proper bearing. and unlike the others who went to ground, he continued to follow dead orders. the government offered him back pay but he declined. he was, however, given a pension.



#9 KJ Jr

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:32 PM

Sorry I don't buy it. The wacko murdered villagers well after Japan surrendered, there is no honor for this man.
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"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#10 ptimms

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:48 PM

i think you ought to be more understanding. onoda was a special case. most of the other stragglers knew the war was over and they turned native for reasons like shame, or fear of negative opinion. onoda, on the other hand, waged a guerilla war up to the 70s because those were his expressed orders: to hold out until he was relieved, even if he had to live on coconuts. he was trained in urban and guerilla warfare. he thought the war was still on. he saw news papers that japan was rich and prosperous, so he deduced that the fighting had shifted elsewhere. his old CO had to personally come to the island to read to him his orders to surrender.

 

Excuses, he knew the war was lost when he went there and his own Officers blocked him from completeing his mission, leaflets were dropped throughout the period saying the war was over and he must have had a damn good idea. Nazi's were strung up for killing less than 30 civilians during the war but he was not punished for killing after the war was over. Japan did not need a hero, it needed to accept responsibility for it's crimes. To a greater degree I do not think they have.



People of every colour marching side by side
Marching cross these fields where a million fascists died
You're bound to lose, you fascists are bound to lose


#11 mac_bolan00

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 06:11 AM

i frankly don't understand your sentiments. filipinos as a whole were understanding: there have been many cases of stragglers here that it was part of popular culture up to the 80s. the japanese government paid the municipality of lubang island $1.0 million in compensation. onoda wasn't impressed with the leaflets, or even when his real brother came over, speaking in a mike and singing their childhood songs. the guy cracked and onoda thought the jinx was up. the brother explained later that his voice broke because it was his last day on the island. 



#12 ptimms

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 06:23 AM

Nor me yours, we're the families of the people he murdered as understanding rather than the Filipinos in general. By the 70's/80's the  Government had nothing to gain by annoying the Japanese economic superpower and much to lose.



People of every colour marching side by side
Marching cross these fields where a million fascists died
You're bound to lose, you fascists are bound to lose


#13 mac_bolan00

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 08:20 AM

japan, inc. was at its height in the 90s (at least that's how it felt here.) the 70s was a time of reconciliation and charm offensives by the japanese. they were dropping dollars around asia like rain. revisionism started roundabout the 90s.

 

i remember there was some noise made by locals in the island still during the 90s when onoda paid a visit but nothing serious. he targeted mainly soldiers and cops (guys who shot back.)



#14 A-58

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:29 AM

Once he got his back pay, I'm sure he went straight for the Comfort Women Station for a little overdue R & R.  


"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)





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