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Japanese holdouts fought for decades after WWII, read transcript. watch video report..


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#1 sniper1946

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 03:25 PM

Lateline - 12/11/2010: Japanese holdouts fought for decades after WWII
see video story too ...:)

Japanese man Hiroo Onoda continued to fight his own gorilla war for 29 years after World War II, refusing to believe the fight was over.

Transcript

LEIGH SALES, PRESENTER: They were known as the holdouts, Japanese soldiers who refused to surrender after the end of World War II.

Dozens fought on from their jungle strongholds, refusing to believe that the Japanese empire had been defeated.

One of the last to surrender was Hiroo Onoda who spent 30 years waging his own guerrilla war on an island in the Philippines.

He eventually laid down his arms after his former commanding officer returned to the Philippines in 1974 and ordered him to give up.

North Asia correspondent Mark Willacy reports from Tokyo.

Edited by sniper1946, 12 November 2010 - 03:38 PM.


#2 Owen

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 07:51 AM

He's died aged 91.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...d-asia-25772192

#3 ptimms

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 05:09 PM

I'm not too bothered he didn't hold out in life any longer. This unrepentant loon continued to murder long after his murderous comrades went home.


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People of every colour marching side by side
Marching cross these fields where a million fascists died
You're bound to lose, you fascists are bound to lose


#4 A-58

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 06:15 AM

I wonder if they got back pay?

"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#5 KJ Jr

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 11:35 PM

I'm not too bothered he didn't hold out in life any longer. This unrepentant loon continued to murder long after his murderous comrades went home.


And he was celebrated as a hero. It's shameful. Was he loyal to a fault, yes. Was he tapped in the head, absolutely.

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#6 George Patton

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Posted 19 January 2014 - 02:31 AM

I wonder if they got back pay?

 

The Taiwanese holdout who surrendered in 1978 did (after some 'public outrage'), so I would assume that the Lt. did as well.


Best Regards,
Alan


#7 mac_bolan00

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:12 AM

I'm not too bothered he didn't hold out in life any longer. This unrepentant loon continued to murder long after his murderous comrades went home.

 

i think you ought to be more understanding. onoda was a special case. most of the other stragglers knew the war was over and they turned native for reasons like shame, or fear of negative opinion. onoda, on the other hand, waged a guerilla war up to the 70s because those were his expressed orders: to hold out until he was relieved, even if he had to live on coconuts. he was trained in urban and guerilla warfare. he thought the war was still on. he saw news papers that japan was rich and prosperous, so he deduced that the fighting had shifted elsewhere. his old CO had to personally come to the island to read to him his orders to surrender.



#8 mac_bolan00

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 08:18 AM

And he was celebrated as a hero. It's shameful. Was he loyal to a fault, yes. Was he tapped in the head, absolutely.

 

japan after the surrender was sorely lacking in one thing: a genuine war hero, and onoda happened to fit the bill. no japanese soldier, especially those captured, came home expecting to be treated a hero. they were all afraid that the populace would not forgive them for the defeat. but all received warm welcomes. unlike most of the other hold outs, onoda was an officer; of proper bearing. and unlike the others who went to ground, he continued to follow dead orders. the government offered him back pay but he declined. he was, however, given a pension.



#9 KJ Jr

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:32 PM

Sorry I don't buy it. The wacko murdered villagers well after Japan surrendered, there is no honor for this man.
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"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#10 ptimms

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 02:48 PM

i think you ought to be more understanding. onoda was a special case. most of the other stragglers knew the war was over and they turned native for reasons like shame, or fear of negative opinion. onoda, on the other hand, waged a guerilla war up to the 70s because those were his expressed orders: to hold out until he was relieved, even if he had to live on coconuts. he was trained in urban and guerilla warfare. he thought the war was still on. he saw news papers that japan was rich and prosperous, so he deduced that the fighting had shifted elsewhere. his old CO had to personally come to the island to read to him his orders to surrender.

 

Excuses, he knew the war was lost when he went there and his own Officers blocked him from completeing his mission, leaflets were dropped throughout the period saying the war was over and he must have had a damn good idea. Nazi's were strung up for killing less than 30 civilians during the war but he was not punished for killing after the war was over. Japan did not need a hero, it needed to accept responsibility for it's crimes. To a greater degree I do not think they have.



People of every colour marching side by side
Marching cross these fields where a million fascists died
You're bound to lose, you fascists are bound to lose


#11 mac_bolan00

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 06:11 AM

i frankly don't understand your sentiments. filipinos as a whole were understanding: there have been many cases of stragglers here that it was part of popular culture up to the 80s. the japanese government paid the municipality of lubang island $1.0 million in compensation. onoda wasn't impressed with the leaflets, or even when his real brother came over, speaking in a mike and singing their childhood songs. the guy cracked and onoda thought the jinx was up. the brother explained later that his voice broke because it was his last day on the island. 



#12 ptimms

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 06:23 AM

Nor me yours, we're the families of the people he murdered as understanding rather than the Filipinos in general. By the 70's/80's the  Government had nothing to gain by annoying the Japanese economic superpower and much to lose.



People of every colour marching side by side
Marching cross these fields where a million fascists died
You're bound to lose, you fascists are bound to lose


#13 mac_bolan00

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Posted 28 July 2014 - 08:20 AM

japan, inc. was at its height in the 90s (at least that's how it felt here.) the 70s was a time of reconciliation and charm offensives by the japanese. they were dropping dollars around asia like rain. revisionism started roundabout the 90s.

 

i remember there was some noise made by locals in the island still during the 90s when onoda paid a visit but nothing serious. he targeted mainly soldiers and cops (guys who shot back.)



#14 A-58

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Posted 30 July 2014 - 01:29 AM

Once he got his back pay, I'm sure he went straight for the Comfort Women Station for a little overdue R & R.  


"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#15 WarPony45

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Posted 30 August 2014 - 02:05 AM

You gotta show respect to the Japs. Sons of bitches would never give up. They'd kill themselves instead of surrendering. They'd sign up to fly planes into ships and charge at the enemy even though they knew they were gonna die. That is some serious loyalty. You gotta show a least some respect.

#16 A-58

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 04:23 AM

No, no respect for Japanese bast@rds. Their sub-human behavior in the war towards POWs and non-combatants in occupied areas leaves much to be desired.  Read up on the Rape of Nanking for starters, then continue on with the Bataan Death March and any other incident where Allied personnel or civilians had the misfortune of falling under Japanese authority. 


"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#17 KJ Jr

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 07:06 PM

I don't think respect is the proper terminology one should use in describing the Japanese soldier in WW2. The fanatical, archaic ideology tortured, enslaved and murdered thousands upon thousands of civilians and POWs. To this day I have never heard a governing body on the Island of Japan ever claim remorse for the events that occurred in China and throughout the war.

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


#18 formerjughead

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 08:26 PM

I know I am going to hate myself; but, you need to read the book: "Letters from Iwo Jima" it gives a unique and personal insight to the Japanese soldier late in the war.

I agree though that "respect" is the wrong word especially when it is used to recognize pure fanaticism. I mean, I can appreciate staying at your post until properly relieved but Oto took that to an entirely new level, 30 years is a long time to wait for a flicker of common sense.

It almost makes you think there was some appreciation, on his part, for the seriousness of the atrocities perpetrated by the Japanese during the war; almost like he didn't want to come out of the hills and face the music, he knew he was wrong.

#19 A-58

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Posted 31 August 2014 - 09:39 PM

I read one account of a proud Japanese warrior who served valiantly at Nanking and survived the war.  He stated that at the time he and his most honorable comrades thought nothing of throwing babies into the air and "catching" them with fixed bayonets and raping women and small girls, much less having hours of bayonet practice on live POWs.  It wasn't until after the war and he went home and started raising his own family, to include girls that he finally realized the they had been bad boys during the war. Give me a break.  


"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#20 A-58

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 02:42 AM

Another little known example of the monstrous behavior of the benevolent warriors of the Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere took place after the Doolittle Raid in 1942.  At least 250,000 Chinese civilians were killed by the IJA while they were beating the bush looking for the survivors of the raid.  


"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#21 Takao

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 03:51 AM

Ummm,

 

A retaliatory strike by the Japanese was expected, and we knew that the Nationalist Chinese Army was not going to be able hold the line.

 

We attacked anyway...For a "morale" victory, not a military one.

 

What does that say about us and how we valued the lives of these Chinese civilians?



#22 A-58

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 05:54 AM

Ummm,

 

A retaliatory strike by the Japanese was expected, and we knew that the Nationalist Chinese Army was not going to be able hold the line.

 

We attacked anyway...For a "morale" victory, not a military one.

 

What does that say about us and how we valued the lives of these Chinese civilians?

 

 Well your are very right about that.  I also read that Chiang Kai-shek was adamantly opposed to the raid once he found out about it due to that fact you pointed out, but reluctantly went along with it. It's not clear to me whether Chiang was in on the initial plans, and I also don't think that anyone in Washington expected the IJA's subsequent Zhejiang-Jiangxi Campaign (May-Sept 1942) in response to the raid to be that massively bloody. In fact, two days before the Doolittle Raid commenced, the Japanese Imperial Staff made operational plans to clear the very area that the Doolittle raiders parachuted into after the mission, fearing possible air attacks against Japan from there.  Of course the Japanese had a royal case of the ass after the raid, and took their business up with the Chinese with extreme prejudice to say the least.The IJA burned towns and villages to the ground, devastating the area and butchering civilians that stood in the way after rolling up Nationalist Army units. Japanese forces also conducted biological warfare too, spreading cholera, typhoid, the plague and dysentery pathogens as well. 

 

The point I was making was the savage behavior of Japanese troops during the war.  Dastardly business all around.  But you are correct in your statements.  


"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#23 formerjughead

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 06:17 AM

It's difficult for me to comprehend how an ideology can be so indifferent towards another. There is certainly a similarity to the behavior of the IJA, in China during WW2, and the current state of affairs in Iraqistan.

How can one group hold the value of another group's lives in such low esteem; were they that fearful of their government or did they just feel that their cause was so righteous that is was above reproach?

Something was systematically flawed in Japan.

#24 A-58

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 06:48 AM

I feel that in both cases, similar mentalities were at work.  They both felt that they were superior to all they opposed.  You can throw the Nazis in there too. I figure that they also felt that they couldn't lose either, so who was going to be able to hold them accountable afterwards.  


"On the Plains of Hesitation, lies the blackened bones of countless millions who,
at the dawn of victory sat down to rest, and resting died"....

(Adlai Stevenson to Harry Truman on discussing the pros and cons of dropping the big one, or so I'm told)


#25 KJ Jr

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Posted 01 September 2014 - 08:50 PM

I feel that in both cases, similar mentalities were at work. They both felt that they were superior to all they opposed. You can throw the Nazis in there too. I figure that they also felt that they couldn't lose either, so who was going to be able to hold them accountable afterwards.


I think your last statement is very telling. The superiority in their minds coupled with government definitely went hand in hand.

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking." - George S. Patton

 

 

 

 

 

 

 





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