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Why were the Axis called that?


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#1 Krystal80

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 03:41 AM

I think this is probably one of those dumb questions, but I can see the Allies part but how did the name Axis come about?
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#2 LRusso216

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 03:48 AM

Not really a dumb question. I'll bet there are lots of folks who don't know where it came from, but just never asked. Rather than a long-winded explanation, I'll just put this up from another site.

On November 1, 1936, Germany and Italy, reflecting their common interest in destabilizing the European order, announced a Rome-Berlin Axis one week after signing a treaty of friendship. Nearly a month later, on November 25, 1936, Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan signed the so-called Anti-Comintern Pact directed at the Soviet Union. Italy joined the Anti-Comintern Pact on November 6, 1937. On May 22, 1939, Germany and Italy signed the so-called Pact of Steel, formalizing the Axis alliance with military provisions. Finally, on September 27, 1940, Germany, Italy, and Japan signed the Tripartite Pact, which became known as the Axis alliance.

Axis Alliance in World War II

Hope that answers your question.
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Lou


#3 formerjughead

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 03:53 AM

Not even mildly silly

The term "axis" is believed to have been first coined by Hungary's fascist prime minister Gyula Gömbös who advocated an alliance of Germany, Hungary, and Italy and worked as an intermediary between Germany and Italy to lessen differences between the two countries to achieve such an alliance.[3] Gömbös' sudden death in 1936 while negotiating with Germany in Munich and the arrival of a non-fascist successor to him ended Hungary's initial involvement in pursuing a trilateral axis, but the lessening of differences between Germany and Italy would lead to a bilateral axis being formed.[3]
In November 1936, the term "axis" was first officially used by Italian dictator Benito Mussolini when he spoke of a Rome-German axis arising out of the treaty of friendship signed between Italy and Germany on 25 October 1936, around which the other states of Europe (and of the world) would revolve. This treaty was forged when Italy, originally opposed to Nazi Germany, was faced with opposition to its war in Abyssinia from the League of Nations and received support from Germany. Later, in May 1939, this relationship transformed into an alliance, which Mussolini called the "Pact of Steel".
The "Axis powers" formally took the name after the Tripartite Pact was signed by Germany, Italy and Japan on September 27, 1940 in Berlin, Germany. The pact was subsequently joined by Hungary (November 20, 1940), Romania (November 23, 1940), Slovakia (November 24, 1940) and Bulgaria (March 1, 1941). The Italian name Roberto briefly acquired a new meaning from "Rome-Berlin-Tokyo" between 1940 and 1945.[citation needed] Its most militarily powerful members were Germany and Japan. These two nations had also signed the Anti-Comintern Pact with each other as allies before the Tripartite Pact in 1936.
Axis powers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


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#4 Krystal80

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 04:15 PM

Thanks for the answers both of you. I just knew I would get the boot from here for that question. I can rest easy now and be a little smarter too :)

Krystal

#5 lwd

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 04:46 PM

A good question is often worth as much or more than a good answer. Sometimes takes more courage as well.

#6 LRusso216

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Posted 04 February 2011 - 05:42 PM

That's well said. One should never back off from asking a question. An honest question always deserves an honest answer. How can you learn if you don't ask?

BTW, thanks for the salute.

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#7 formerjughead

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 01:06 AM

Thanks for the answers both of you. I just knew I would get the boot from here for that question. I can rest easy now and be a little smarter too :)

Krystal


There is nothing wrong with an Honest question. It's refreshing.

#8 Poppy

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 03:07 AM

K80, good question. I'd like to ask why the allies were called the "Allied forces" and where that title officially came from.

#9 Krystal80

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 06:31 PM

Oh man, I guess I don't really know. I figured it was like the word means-they allied together to win the war. I could be way off...most likely am as that seems to simple of an answer.

#10 ULITHI

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 06:55 PM

I don't know if I am wording this correctly, but did the Axis Powers share a trans-national term for the Allied Powers? They didn't actually call us the Allied Powers, did they?
Have a good one,
Darren

#11 brndirt1

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Posted 05 February 2011 - 07:07 PM

I might be going out on too thin a limb here, but I believe the term "allies" started showing up during the Napoleonic Wars when the non-French forces allied to combat he and his. Then the term continued on when the "allies" banded together to battle the Russians in the Crimean War, which was the French, British, and Turks combating the Russian Tzar, then in the First World War when the "allies" took on the Central Powers, but that time it included the Japanese, the Italians and the Tzar's Russians.

It appears that the "allies" end up being the forces which ally together to battle an aggressor nation or combination of nations. Just a guess of course.
Happy Trails,
Clint.




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