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Is There A Book That You Want To Read But It Doesn't Exist?


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#1 John S

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 09:21 PM

I guess that I could have used subject instead of book in the title. So, is there a book and/or subject that you would like to read about that has never been researched and/or written about? Maybe there are some authors out there that are currently writing about it now. Great! Tell me about it. Years ago, I wanted to read about the evacuation of Arnhem, but no book existed. This led to me researching and writing, `The Storm Boat Kings'.
So, what hasn't been covered? I would prefer if we kept it to WWII, but I will keep it open to all time periods.
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John Sliz

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#2 Poppy

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 10:05 PM

I'd like to read more Japanese WW2 individual air battle accounts. Especially Ki43 vs P40. Heard there aren't a whole bunch of those out there. Someone recommended a book, but can't afford that luxury.

#3 urqh

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:39 AM

Anorak...maybe...but there is a reason...I'll take this one...British General Post Office land line links during before and during ww2....Telecoms isbn....? From that I'll draw a picture of many things unknown...

British Army 1939-1945 - World War II Tribute Video

 

 

[URL="http://youtu.be/Zbp_4XBmD4w"]

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 


#4 Von Poop

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 01:14 PM

A decent one-volume English-Language well-illustrated encyclopaedia of French Tanks.
It can all be found scattered about in various Focus, Concord, Schiffer 'booklets', but I've still yet to see a solid equivalent to assorted encyclopaedic titles on other nations' machines.

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#5 leccy1

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:46 PM

A book about the Sappers, all branches and detailed with equipment, units, taskings. If foreign equivalents to the Sappers can be added or made into a related series that would be interesting for me.

I have several books giving overviews about single operations, some books have the RE mentioned in a roundabout way, most info I have is pamphlets or journals giving info about a single piece of kit etc.
I have searched intermittently for quite a few years now.
Currently my selection covers a 1904 British Army Manual upto Follow the Sapper from 2006.

I would love a full history of them but ones covering Napoleonic period, Crimea, WW1 and of course WW2 would suit me at least.

#6 Biak

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 06:54 PM

I'd like to read more Japanese WW2 individual air battle accounts. Especially Ki43 vs P40. Heard there aren't a whole bunch of those out there. Someone recommended a book, but can't afford that luxury.


Poppy I found this book listed at amazon (although I haven't read it), price not too bad;

Amazon.com: Samurai ! (9780671563103): Saburo Sakai, Martin Caidin, Fred Saito: Books

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#7 phylo_roadking

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 08:27 PM

A British-POV equivalent of Schenk for Sealion; there's a lot out there, but as mentioned about French tanks, it's very scattered at the minute.

A FULL campaign history for WESERUBUNG. Again, there's a recent and detailed German POV, but the British POV still depends on Derry's official history, all the individual memoirs and regimental histories, and Kersaudy.

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#8 Biak

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 10:32 PM

For Poppy;

A short snippet of Japanese pilot report;
Hiroyoshi Nishizawa: Japan's World War II Ace of Aces

Many leading fighter pilots of World War II, such as Germany's Erich Hartmann, Russia's Ivan Kozhedub and America's Richard Bong, looked as if they had been born for the honor. Japan's ace-of-aces, Hiroyoshi Nishizawa, was a striking exception. One of his comrades in arms, Saburo Sakai, wrote that 'one felt the man should be in a hospital bed. He was tall and lanky for a Japanese, nearly five feet eight inches in height. He had a gaunt look about him; he weighed only 140 pounds, and his ribs protruded sharply through his skin.' Although Nishizawa was accomplished in both judo and sumo, Sakai noted that his comrade'suffered almost constantly from malaria and tropical skin disease. He was pale most of the time.'

Sakai, who was one of Nishizawa's few friends, described him as usually being coldly reserved and taciturn, 'almost like a pensive outcast instead of a man who was in reality the object of veneration.' To the select few who earned his trust, however, Nishizawa was intensely loyal.

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#9 Poppy

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 10:39 PM

Thanks B. Started reading and see there are 6 pages. Bookmarked. As well as some other good nuts there. Cheers

#10 Oktam

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 09:02 PM

Hitler's diary.

#11 urqh

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 09:24 PM

Didnt the Sunday Times in the UK have a copy of that once....Errrrr....Maybe their own invention of...

British Army 1939-1945 - World War II Tribute Video

 

 

[URL="http://youtu.be/Zbp_4XBmD4w"]

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

 


#12 Gromit801

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 10:00 PM

Love to have a book about "Pat" Pattle, based on the actual 33 Squadron records, which were lost in the moving around.
"I love deadlines. I love the 'Whooshing' noise they make when they go by." - Doug Adams

#13 Poppy

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Posted 08 November 2011 - 10:50 PM

OH. I know...Joseph Smiths golden plates. The English version, not the Egyption one. That would be an excellent read. ...Maybe Tom Cruise's diary: dear diary, entered the closet and can't come out...

#14 Mehar

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 03:27 AM

I'd like to see more books on the involvement of colonial nations during the World Wars, there isn't really much information on their contributions, what was happening in those countries, etc as there are with the other nations involved.

#15 Gromit801

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 04:24 PM

Love to have Yamamoto's autobiography.
"I love deadlines. I love the 'Whooshing' noise they make when they go by." - Doug Adams

#16 belasar

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 06:38 PM

Love to have Yamamoto's autobiography.


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Wars are rarely fought in black and white, but in infinite shades of grey

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#17 JBark

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 04:18 PM

A very good question. I have come to focus on armor as my means of learning a fair amount about WWII. I change my focus now and again and may change it permantly some day but for now armor it is. That said when I look for books of interest I like to read about development of the tanks and of their use. I liked Hunnicutt's boo on the Sherman but it was so in depth that it bordered on the dry. Zaloga's Armored Thunderbolt was a great work but could have been twice as long (more in depth) and would have been my vote for the greatest book on WWII. I am hoping Jentz's Panzertruppen will be comparable. I would love to see one book, possibly two volumes dedicated to the interwar development of armor and armor doctrine followed by possibly a third volume describing armor performance and doctrine change during the war.

#18 Kai-Petri

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 06:07 PM

" To leave or not to leave" the same title by Josif Stalin Kreml late Nov 1941 and Adolf Hitler mid-April 1945... ;) Personal diary by both.
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#19 cbiwv

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 10:29 PM

There are not nearly enough books on the Soviets. I'm talking after action report and individual unit histories. I would also like to see more information on the individual Heer Infantry divisions. There is a ton of info on everything else out there.

#20 John S

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 08:12 PM

There are a number of problems about researching the Soviets for us here in the west. The language and the distance are two big ones for me.
John Sliz

`Studying Engineers In WWII'

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#21 John S

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 08:16 PM

A book about the Sappers, all branches and detailed with equipment, units, taskings. If foreign equivalents to the Sappers can be added or made into a related series that would be interesting for me.

I have several books giving overviews about single operations, some books have the RE mentioned in a roundabout way, most info I have is pamphlets or journals giving info about a single piece of kit etc.
I have searched intermittently for quite a few years now.
Currently my selection covers a 1904 British Army Manual upto Follow the Sapper from 2006.

I would love a full history of them but ones covering Napoleonic period, Crimea, WW1 and of course WW2 would suit me at least.


As one who has written a number of books on the Royal Engineers, the Royal Canadian Engineers and the Corps of Engineers, I think that the book you want would be the size of a house.
The entire history of the R.C.E. is 3 thick volumes and the R.E. one is what 12 or more volumes. And they don't cover all of it.
John Sliz

`Studying Engineers In WWII'

www.stormboatkings.ca




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