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Dad in the ETO - 9 APR 1944 to 6 OCT 1945


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#1 ToughOmbre

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 03:50 PM

My father.....

Private First Class Stephen A. Voskian, Rifleman, Cannon Company, 358th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division.

Bronze Invasion Arrowhead - Utah Beach
Combat Infantryman Badge
Five Battle Stars (Normandy, Northern France, Central Europe, Ardennes, Rhineland)
Bronze Star
Purple Heart
Distinguished Unit Citation

Army of Occupation - Germany

He truly was a "Tough 'Ombre"!

Steve

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"They fought together as brothers-in-arms. They died together and now they sleep side by side. To them we have a solemn obligation." - Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 2 September, 1945

#2 sebfrench76

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 04:11 PM

You are proud of him,indeed,and he disserves your admiration.

#3 Natman

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 04:51 PM

Hey Steve,
Thanks for posting the photos. My Dad was in the 607th TD Bn, attached to the 90th from June thru Oct, 44.

Welcome to the forum.

#4 Earthican

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 09:05 PM

Good stuff ToughOmbre

You are quite lucky to have a clear picture of your father's service (plus actual pictures!!!)

Just a few clarifications you might find helpful. You list Riflemen which I imagine was his Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) for which he was trained and qualified. However there are few (if any) Riflemen in the Infantry Regiment Cannon Company. I imagine he was later assigned to the Cannon Company and OJT'ed (on the job trained) with another set of skills. Most enlisted men in the Cannon Company would be gun-crewmen which took few casualties and not much need for converted Riflemen. One other enlisted position that did take casualties and could use the skills of a Riflemen would be part of a Forward Observer Team, which would consist of an officer and few enlistedmen for radio operators and security. Working closely with the Rifle Companies an FO team needed to know their way around the front. I find it plausible that your father found his way to an FO team after service with a Rifle Company.

I am also curious if your father trained with the 90th Division from its activation or perhaps joined the Division later from an Infantry Replacement Training Center (IRTC)? From the date of your father's start of active service it might be possible to infer which route he took to the Infantry.

In any case, Best Wishes!!!!

#5 ToughOmbre

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 10:32 PM

Good stuff ToughOmbre

You are quite lucky to have a clear picture of your father's service (plus actual pictures!!!)

Just a few clarifications you might find helpful. You list Riflemen which I imagine was his Military Occupational Specialty (MOS) for which he was trained and qualified. However there are few (if any) Riflemen in the Infantry Regiment Cannon Company. I imagine he was later assigned to the Cannon Company and OJT'ed (on the job trained) with another set of skills. Most enlisted men in the Cannon Company would be gun-crewmen which took few casualties and not much need for converted Riflemen. One other enlisted position that did take casualties and could use the skills of a Riflemen would be part of a Forward Observer Team, which would consist of an officer and few enlistedmen for radio operators and security. Working closely with the Rifle Companies an FO team needed to know their way around the front. I find it plausible that your father found his way to an FO team after service with a Rifle Company.

I am also curious if your father trained with the 90th Division from its activation or perhaps joined the Division later from an Infantry Replacement Training Center (IRTC)? From the date of your father's start of active service it might be possible to infer which route he took to the Infantry.

In any case, Best Wishes!!!!


Thanks Earthican!

You bring up some good points that got me thinking. I got the "Cannon Company" info off of his Bronze Star commendation. Not sure how accurate that is knowing how the army could confuse things. Anyway he definitely was a rifleman, but as you say, he could have been moved around, but I'm inclined to think that your question makes me think that the Cannon Company reference may be less than accurate. I remember him telling of how he often walked the "point" with his unit. And his war stories led me to believe he was in a rifle company.

As to his joining the 90th........Long story short.

He was an artillery instructor at Fort Sill OK. Got into a disagreement with his CO. CO transferred him into the 90th shortly after (or maybe before) they got their orders to deploy to the ETO. At least that's the best I can remember.

Sure wish he was still around to answer some of these questions, but in spirit he will always be with me.

Thanks again for your interest.

Steve
"They fought together as brothers-in-arms. They died together and now they sleep side by side. To them we have a solemn obligation." - Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 2 September, 1945

#6 ToughOmbre

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 10:35 PM

Hey Steve,
Thanks for posting the photos. My Dad was in the 607th TD Bn, attached to the 90th from June thru Oct, 44.

Welcome to the forum.


Very cool Natman!

Wonder if they ever crossed paths? :cool:

Steve
"They fought together as brothers-in-arms. They died together and now they sleep side by side. To them we have a solemn obligation." - Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 2 September, 1945

#7 ToughOmbre

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Posted 13 December 2011 - 10:36 PM

You are proud of him,indeed,and he disserves your admiration.


Thanks sebfrench76!

Steve
"They fought together as brothers-in-arms. They died together and now they sleep side by side. To them we have a solemn obligation." - Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 2 September, 1945

#8 Clementine

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 01:53 AM

A salute to your father for his service. Love the photos.

(My father also served in Europe.)

Welcome.

Proud Daughter of a WWII Veteran, 608 Engineer Light Equipment Company  

 

 


#9 TD-Tommy776

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 02:40 AM

Thanks for sharing your father's story and photos, TO. Really great stuff.

Freedom is precious and many gave their lives for it. It is the duty of the future generation
to remember that sacrifice, and offer some sacrifice for themselves if Freedom is threatened.

Cecil Earl Workman, WWII Veteran, "L" Co., 129th Inf. Regt., 37th Inf. Div.


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PFC Glenn W. Halvorson

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PFC Norman L. Halvorson


#10 Natman

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 03:18 AM

Very cool Natman!

Wonder if they ever crossed paths?


Dad was in C Co which was usually supporting the 359th IR, so it's unlikely they did. Guess you never know though?

Have you tried to get 358th records from the NARA yet?

#11 Earthican

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 03:52 PM

Thanks Earthican!

You bring up some good points that got me thinking. I got the "Cannon Company" info off of his Bronze Star commendation. Not sure how accurate that is knowing how the army could confuse things. Anyway he definitely was a rifleman, but as you say, he could have been moved around, but I'm inclined to think that your question makes me think that the Cannon Company reference may be less than accurate. I remember him telling of how he often walked the "point" with his unit. And his war stories led me to believe he was in a rifle company.

As to his joining the 90th........Long story short.

He was an artillery instructor at Fort Sill OK. Got into a disagreement with his CO. CO transferred him into the 90th shortly after (or maybe before) they got their orders to deploy to the ETO. At least that's the best I can remember.

Sure wish he was still around to answer some of these questions, but in spirit he will always be with me.

Thanks again for your interest.

Steve


Ahh the plot grows thicker...

A hundred different speculations could now be made for how he got from the Field Artillery to the Infantry. But I'll restrain myself...

Is the Bronze Star a complete write-up for a specific action or a "generic" exceptional service for months of combat? If it's for the former then I would trust its accuracy. However I think I have noticed that a commendation text will show a soldiers rank and unit at the time the award is presented, not when it was earned.

Feel free to share more, if you like, you got my interest.

#12 Krystal80

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 08:31 PM

My great uncle was also with the 90th, 359 infantry. He was KIA Aug 20, 1944. You may already know, but there are some great books on the 90th detailing their actions and also a 90th Div Association with several vets and their families. They are online and also send out a newsletter. Dues are $20. They have reunions too, but I haven't had a chance to go. James Reid is the secretary and I believe was also with the 358th. He may be able to tell you more info on your dads service.

#13 ToughOmbre

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Posted 14 December 2011 - 08:55 PM

My great uncle was also with the 90th, 359 infantry. He was KIA Aug 20, 1944. You may already know, but there are some great books on the 90th detailing their actions and also a 90th Div Association with several vets and their families. They are online and also send out a newsletter. Dues are $20. They have reunions too, but I haven't had a chance to go. James Reid is the secretary and I believe was also with the 358th. He may be able to tell you more info on your dads service.


Sorry to hear about your great uncle. I'm sure you're proud of him, as am I, along with all the "Tough 'Ombres". I do have a lot of material on the 90th and am familiar with the 90th Div Association.

Thanks,
Steve
"They fought together as brothers-in-arms. They died together and now they sleep side by side. To them we have a solemn obligation." - Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, 2 September, 1945

#14 Krystal80

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Posted 15 December 2011 - 07:39 PM

Oh great, they have been wonderful about answering my questions. A very proud division for sure...but I'm sure they all were. Yes, very proud of my great uncle. He was a family favorite as a kid and according to my grandparents, it nearly destroyed his mother when he was killed.




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