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D-Day Invasion


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#1 Colin

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Posted 13 January 2003 - 08:50 PM

hello again. i have a question about a certain type of beach obstacle. i've been trying to find out what it is and what it does but no luck yet. it's a long wooden log that is elevated into sort of an angle by supports. if anyone could please tell me what they are and their purpose, i would really appreciate it. thanks
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#2 Martin Bull

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Posted 13 January 2003 - 09:06 PM

I don't know if you mean something like this. Many of the D-Day Foreshore Obstacle defences were designed on an ad hoc basis with input from Rommel himself.

'Foreshore obstacles consisted in their essentials of : -

1) Stakes driven into the sea bottom, many carrying an anti-tank mine at the tip.
2 ) Concrete tetrahedrons, also equipped at the apex with either steel blades or anti-tank mines
3) Various other items, such as captured anti-tank obstacles
4) Rommel's proposed 'nutracker mine'. This consisted of a stake let into a concrete housing containing a heavy shell. A landing-craft striking the stake would, by lever action, cause the other end to press against the fuze and detonate the shell. '

Liddell Hart, note to 'The Rommel Papers', 1953 p. 458.
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#3 charlie don't surf

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Posted 13 January 2003 - 09:08 PM

The obstacles you are thinking of are for denying ships access to the beach.

regards

#4 C.Evans

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Posted 13 January 2003 - 11:56 PM

They were also used because they were to rip the bottoms out of the landing craft.
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#5 Erich

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 12:24 AM

If I remember the pics correctly the logs were euqipped with mines and were used for destroying landing craft/boats as well as amphibious Shermans.

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#6 Panzerknacker

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 06:59 AM

And when the Germans realised troops were moving freely on teh shore, especially at Utah and Omaha-German snipers shot at and detonated the mines, blowing men who were sheltering behind them into smithereens.
Also, the shrapnel from wooden logs is not nice!!! Imagine the destruction such shrapnel wrought!!!
Their original intention was to rip open LC'S, especially the larger ships, detonate the mine, wreck the LCs and cause a buildup on the shore, which the defenders could capitalise on...
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#7 Kai-Petri

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 01:07 PM

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Omaha beach, after D-day battles

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http://www.normandyb...ds.com/book.htm

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http://www.uscg.mil/...h_normandy.html


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#8 De Vlaamse Leeuw

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 01:48 PM

Oh, now that we are talking about D-Day. Can anyone give me some information about the ships used.

Like the LCT, liberty ship, ... I'd like to know a few things about them:
- speed
- reachable targets
- troops they could carry
- tanks they could carry
- the distance they could travel
- ...

Thanx
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#9 Jet

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 04:59 PM

I'm not entirely sure about this but I heard somewhere that the LCT could carry about 30 men and it's top speed was 25 kph (whatever that means :confused: :confused: ). I'm guessing I am probably wrong on both counts, but just thought I'd give it a try.

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#10 Jet

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 05:07 PM

Oh yeah before I forget. Great pictures Kai 2nd and 4th pictures taken by Robert Capa on Omaha beach
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#11 De Vlaamse Leeuw

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 05:23 PM

kph means probably kilometers per hour.
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#12 Doc Raider

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 05:50 PM

I think if it's in nautical terms in probably means knots per hour. Although the spelling is off, knots means nautical miles.

[ 14. January 2003, 11:51 AM: Message edited by: Doc Raider ]

#13 Doc Raider

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 05:53 PM

Just to give you an idea of knots,
Conversion table for
knots to miles per hour
KTS to MPH 5 Knots = 5.8 MPH
10 Knots = 11.5 MPH
15 Knots = 17.3 MPH
20 Knots = 23.0 MPH
25 Knots = 28.8 MPH
30 Knots = 34.6 MPH
35 Knots = 40.3 MPH
40 Knots = 46.1 MPH
45 Knots = 51.8 MPH
50 Knots = 57.6 MPH
55 Knots = 63.4 MPH
60 Knots = 69.1 MPH
65 Knots = 74.9 MPH
70 Knots = 80.6 MPH
75 Knots = 86.4 MPH
80 Knots = 92.2 MPH
85 Knots = 97.9 MPH
90 Knots = 103.7 MPH
95 Knots = 109.4 MPH
100 Knots = 115.2 MPH
105 Knots = 121.0 MPH
110 Knots = 126.7 MPH
115 Knots = 132.5 MPH
120 Knots = 138.2 MPH
125 Knots = 144.0 MPH
130 Knots = 149.8 MPH
135 Knots = 155.5 MPH
140 Knots = 161.3 MPH
145 Knots = 167.0 MPH
150 Knots = 172.8 MPH

http://www.disasterc...com/convert.htm

#14 De Vlaamse Leeuw

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Posted 14 January 2003 - 06:25 PM

Do you know where I can find a conversion in KMH (kilomers per hour)?
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#15 Sniper

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Posted 19 January 2003 - 03:34 AM

Erwin, here’s a few basic specs on the various LCT’s etc. used in WW2.

Landing Ship, Infantry (Large) – LSI/(L)

Crew, 290
Max speed, 18 knots
Range, 22,250 km (13,285 miles) at 14 knots
Capacity, 2 LCM’s, 12 LCA’s, 230 landing craft crew, 1,100 troops

Landing Ship, Infantry (Medium) – LSI(M)

Crew, 170
Max speed, 22 knots
Range, 12,979 km (8,065 miles) at 13 knots
Capacity, 2 LCM’s, 6 LCA’s, 60 landing craft crew, 370 troops

Landing Ship, Tank Mk 1 – LST(1) (converted “Maracaibo” type oil tankers)

Crew, 98
Max speed, 11 knots
Range, 12,045 km (7,845 miles) at 10 knots
Capacity, 2 LCM’s, 20 25-ton tanks, 207 troops

Landing Ship, Tank Mk 1 – LST(1) (purpose built “Boxer” type)

Crew, 169
Max speed, 17 knots
Range, 14,830 km (9,215 miles) at 14 knots
Capacity, 20 medium, or 13 heavy tanks, 27 trucks, 193 troops

Landing Ship, Tank Mk 2 – LST(2)

Crew, 211
Max speed, 10 knots
Range, 11,120 km (6,910 miles) at 9 knots
Capacity, 2 LCVP’s, 18 heavy tanks, 27 trucks, or 1 LCT (5), 163 troops

Landing Ship, Tank Mk 3 – LST(3)

Crew, 104
Max speed, 13 knots
Range, 14,822 km (9,210 miles) at 11 knots
Capacity, 5 LCA’s, 15 heavy, or 27 medium tanks, with crews, 14 trucks, 168 troops

Landing Ship, Dock – (LSD)

Crew, 254
Max speed, 17 knots
Range, 14,830 km (9,215 miles) at 15 knots
Capacity, 2 LCT(3)’s or LCT(4)’s, or 3 LCT(5)’s with relevant crews, 263 troops

Landing Craft, Tank Mk’s 1 to 3 – LCT (1-3)

Crew, 12
Max speed, 10 knots
Range, 1,666 km (1,035 miles) at 10 knots
Capacity, 3 heavy, or 6 medium, tanks with crews

Landing Craft, Tank Mk 4 – LCT(4)

Crew, 12
Max speed, 9 knots
Range, 2,035 km (1,265 miles) at 8 knots
Capacity, 6 heavy, or 9 medium, tanks with crews

Landing Craft, Tank Mk’s 5 to 8 – LCT(5-8)

Crew, 52
Max speed, 13 knots
Range, 6,486 km (4,030 miles) at 11 knots
Capacity, 3 heavy or 5 medium tanks, 54 troops

Landing Craft, Infantry Large and Small – LCI(L) and LCI(S)

Crew, 29
Max speed, 14 knots
Range, 14,822 km (9,210 miles) at 12 knots
Capacity, 210 troops

Landing Craft, Mechanised Mk’s 1 to 7 – LCM(1-7)

Crew, 4
Max speed, 8 knots
Range, 1,577 km (980 miles) at 6 knots
Capacity, 1 medium tank, or 60 troops

Landing Craft, Assault – LCA

Crew, 4
Max speed, 7 knots
Range, 95-150 km (60-95 miles)
Capacity, 35 troops

As well, several landing craft types were converted to other uses, such as the Landing Craft, Flak, (LCF), which carried eight 2-pdr pompom guns and four single 20-mm guns, the Landing Craft, Gun, (LCG), designed to engage pillboxes etc, which carried two 4.7-in guns (usually manned by Royal Marines), and one or two 20-mm guns, and the Landing Craft, Tank (Rocket), LCT®, which could carry over 1,000 rockets, launching them from a distance of about 3 km’s (2 miles) into an area measuring 700 by 150 metres wide. These 1000 rockets would deliver 17 tons of explosives onto the target area in one hit.

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#16 De Vlaamse Leeuw

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Posted 19 January 2003 - 08:47 AM

Thanks Sniper!
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#17 Mike L

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Posted 07 August 2009 - 12:45 AM

Hi all,
Not sure if anyone will see this, last post seems a good while ago.
Sorry Sniper but some of your LCT info is incorrect. I have done some research on this - my uncle was killed on Mk3 LCT Oct 44 (HMLCT 488).
Various marks of LCT (eg1-5) were developed pre D-Day, the largest being the Mk3, produced in 2 series (No.s 300 - 499 and 7001 - 7150). Displacement (light) 350T, loaded 640T (1st series) 625T (2nd series). Dims: o/a length approx 190ft L x 31ft W.
Propulsion: 1st series 2 x 500HP Davey Paxman deisel, 2nd series 2 x Stirling petrol.
Both series max speed approx 10.5 to 11,5 Kts (knots, Nautical MPH).
Best range: Series 1 deisel, 2700 NM @ 9 Kts (24 tons diesel fuel bunker).
Complement (crew):12. Armament 2 x 2pdr or 2 x 20mm AA.
Tank/cargo capacity: 5 Heavy tanks eg Churchill/11 Medium tanks eg Sherman/ 10 x 3 ton lorries/ 300T cargo.
Some Mk3s converted to hospital, kitchen, Gun (LCG), rocket (LCR) and engineering vessels.
Hope that is useful, I have more info if required.

Best regards,

Mike




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