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FOUND! The lost Panzer Division and the wreck of “Marburg” full of German tanks and guns


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#1 knightdepaix

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Posted 13 July 2016 - 02:57 PM

http://www.ww2f.com/...at-this-panzer/

 

FOUND! The lost Panzer Division and the wreck of “Marburg” full of German tanks and guns
as Germany was gearing up for the invasion of the Soviet Union and rather than taking the long way to the front over land, they chose a much quicker way. They were ferried from the port of Patras, Greece across the Adriatic Sea to the port of Taranto, back to Italy.
Kybfels was a cargo ship of 7,764 tons owned by HANSA Bremen. Marburg, just below 7,564 tons, was built in 1928 for the company North German Lloyd.
A previous convoy on May 18, 1941, including those two ships and the Italian transport ship Laura C. transferred via the same route, from Patras to Taranto, the heavy guns and tanks of the 2nd Panzer Division and then returned to Patras to load the remaining tanks, as well as other vehicles and personnel from the Division.
The submarine sailed from Taranto on May 18th and on the evening of the 20th the Italians saw a silhouette of an unknown ship in the area. It later proved to be the mine layer HMS Abdiel, which set the minefield that would cause so much damage to the Axis powers. Shortly afterwards, the Italian destroyer Carlo Mirabello, coming from Italy to Patras, hit a mine and sunk.
The Italian gunboat Pellegrino Matteucci followed, while accompanying an Italian convoy. The most probable reason why the Italians did not warn their German allies of the minefield is that during that time, their relations went sour, the cooperation between the fascists and the nazis in Patras was strained and consultation between the two sides was virtually non-existent.
On May 21st, 1941, at 9:00 in the morning, Kybfels and Marburg were being loaded with vehicles and artillery of the 2nd Armoured Division, with the port of Taranto as their destination. From Italy, they would be carried by rail to the Eastern Front, for Operation “Barbarossa”.
This time, the two ships would be on their own, apart from Italian reconnaissance aircraft that would fly over them. At 14:00 hrs, while the convoy was between Kefalonia and Lefkada islands, a terrible explosion was heard.
Kybfels had struck a mine!
Shortly afterwards Marburg hit a mine too and started to sink!
The minefield was set just the day before by the British mine layer HMS Abdiel, between Kefalonia and Ithaki islands. The exact location of this minefield, in a busy route the Axis shipping used frequently cannot be attributed just to luck. It appears that the British had a very well organised intelligence service in Patras that monitored all the moves of the Axis shipping.
In the book by Kostas Triantafillou, “Historical Dictionary of Patras” it is documented that two Greeks, Martakos and Skamnakis, were arrested “on suspicion of reporting the movements of ships to the enemy” (i.e. the British). 226 Germans were killed or drowned with the two ships, while survivors swam to Lefkada and Kefalonia islands.
HMS Abdiel went down in history as the first mining operation in very deep waters, which surprised the Axis powers in the Mediterranean.

 


Besides the two sunk German transports for the record, a few points can be summed up:
1) Coordination between German and Italian troops was poor due to sour diplomatic relation.
2) Going to Soviet Union is easier from sea route and rail than on ground land: in this case, sailing to Italy and on rail to the SU.
3) British had enough intelligence about Axis shipping in the Med. to conduct mine-laying ahead of time.
4) Italian did not attack or coordinate attacks on their own despite they were aware British had been mine laying.



#2 Skipper

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Posted 14 July 2016 - 07:05 AM

My guess is that the Germans sacrificed those men. Had the route been open and without too many risks  then others would have followed, but the trial proved to be a failure. One or two ships and their suplies would not have made a difference anyway. The Italian aspecti s imortant indeed. Had Mussolini not lost time in Greece the Germans wouldn't have had to worry about the British thwarting their plans in Patras. The result of loosing precious months condemned this route.  


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