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The Planes That WON the War in the Pacific


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32 replies to this topic

#26 TiredOldSoldier

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Posted 26 January 2017 - 07:11 AM

The Japanese did not have a distinct edge at Coral Sea.

 

The 17 G4M Betty bombers that attacked USS Lexington as she attempted to attack Rabaul were slaughtered.  Only two survived the initial attacks, and one of those would crash land on the way back to base.

 

Of course, when you are facing little opposition, things tend to go your own way...Such as the early American carrier raids.

http://www.ibiblio.o...index.html#CONT

An unescorted bomber strike is more an exception to the rule, they usually fared badly, though there were exceptions, especially against the poorly armed Italian and Japanese fighters, when it comes to shooting down bombers firepower is all important and only the A6M, of all early war Japanese fighters, had a decent armament (and IIRC very much by chance as the factory that was originally planned to produce the 20mm for it was taken over by the Army). Up to mid 1942 the Japanese could achieve local air superiority, then they got involved in an attrition campaign that required their planes to fly at the limit of their endurance and things turned against them a they could not sustain that sort of losses..


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#27 lwd

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Posted 26 January 2017 - 01:36 PM

Has everyone had a brain fart concerning the PI, Malaya, DEI, Wake, Indonesia, Darwin, etc? Up till Midway really, the Japanese had the distinct edge in the air.

Or not.  At Wake they faced  a few Buffalos and ended still ended up with more aircraft shot down or damaged than the Marines lost, although FLAK played a big role in that. 

 

Also consider that the conversation to date was focused on the IJN vs the USN and in particular whether the F4F was inferior to the A6M2.  The actions you list above don't have a very large  USN presence do they?  How many F4Fs were involved in those actions?



#28 Takao

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Posted 26 January 2017 - 09:13 PM

Or not.  At Wake they faced  a few Buffalos and ended still ended up with more aircraft shot down or damaged than the Marines lost, although FLAK played a big role in that.

At Wake, the Marines had 12 F4F-3 Wildcats.  The Buffalos were at Midway, as well as, a small contingent(7 aircraft) of F4F Wildcats.

 

AFAIK, the Japanese lost some 24 aircraft at Wake, to the Marines 12, but don't quote me on those losses.

 

Considering the fact that the Japanese G3M Nell bombers destroyed 8 of Wake's F4Fs on the ground on December 8th, and it was only the four remaining Wildcats that did the fighting.  Not bad, not bad at all.


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#29 lwd

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Posted 26 January 2017 - 10:14 PM

Thanks for the correction and additional details.  Japanese losses at Wake are rather indeterminate from what I've read.  In both cases they were rather outnumbered and still gave a decent account of themselves from what I remember reading though.



#30 ResearcherAtLarge

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Posted 06 February 2017 - 05:05 AM

The Hellcat replaced the F4F Wildcat,

 

-Snip-

Now I know what you're thinking. "The B-29s that dropped the nukes won the war" they ended the war...they didn't exactly dominate the theatre.

 

Actually, the F4F was replaced by the F4U. It took the Hellcat a bit longer to make it in theater. And really, that's a simplistic view because the Wildcat was used throughout the entire war, serving on CVEs.

 

Also, the B-29 did far more than just drop atomic bombs, I would recommend reading "Mines away" for a better understanding.


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#31 DT1991

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 03:57 AM

Actually, the F4F was replaced by the F4U. It took the Hellcat a bit longer to make it in theater. And really, that's a simplistic view because the Wildcat was used throughout the entire war, serving on CVEs.

 

Also, the B-29 did far more than just drop atomic bombs, I would recommend reading "Mines away" for a better understanding.

 

But the Hellcat saw much wider use by the US Navy until around early 1945. The only carrier based Corsair squadron to actually see major combat before then was Fighting Squadron 17 of the USS Bunker Hill's original air group, and even then it was replaced by a Hellcat squadron, and the "Jolly Rogers" ended up on land for most of their tour. 



#32 ResearcherAtLarge

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 06:34 AM

Who says the US Navy was the only one fighting in the Pacific?


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#33 TiredOldSoldier

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Posted 14 February 2017 - 06:34 AM

At Wake Nagumo detached Hiryu and Soryu to support the second (successful) effort after the initial failure,  before then the IJN force had no air element except unescorted bombers that to get there had to turn themselves into flying gas tanks if they got hit they were unlikely to survive.


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