Jump to content


We Need Your Help - Become a Site Supporter

For 16 years we've been delivering WWII discussion and research, help support our efforts for the next 16 years. Become a WW2 Forums Patron!


Photo
* * * * * 2 votes

What have you been watching?


  • Please log in to reply
3267 replies to this topic

#3251 stgrhe

stgrhe

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 127 posts
  • LocationKhon Kaen, Thailand

Posted 12 January 2017 - 10:06 AM

Just watched "Tokyo Trial" about the International war crimes tribunal in Tokyo from 1945 to 1948. A deeply flawed process controlled by the American supreme commander and the British judge.

 

I couldn't help but feel there was more to the story than what was shown - how the 28 men to be judged were selected, how thye three charges were arrived at, all the other Japanese officers who were judged in seperate courts and their stories... ETc.

 

Nevertheless it was a very well done 4 episode arc.

 Which one was is? I am still searching for the films about this story.

 

To my knowledge there are three films and one mini-series about this event; 1) Tokyo Trial (Tôkyô saiban) a documentary from 1983, 2) The Tokyo Trial (Dong Jing shen pan) from 2006, 3) Tokyo Trial from 2007, and 4) Tokyo Trial, a mini-series from 2016.



#3252 WW2HistoryGal

WW2HistoryGal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
  • LocationNebraska

Posted 12 January 2017 - 04:33 PM

Got caught up in "The Man in the High Castle". Generally not a fan of alernative history, but the production is pretty good.

 

It's a disturbing look at "what if?". I really enjoy it. And they're been greelit for a third season. Very excited to see what they come up with.


Author of Nebraska POW Camps: World War II Prisoners of War in the Heartland / Available from The History Press and Amazon.com

My World War 2 Reviews Blog: Best of World War 2


#3253 LRusso216

LRusso216

    Graybeard

  • ModeratorsOKF Moderator
  • 12,229 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted 13 January 2017 - 02:10 AM

It's a disturbing look at "what if?". I really enjoy it. And they're been greelit for a third season. Very excited to see what they come up with.


I have to agree. A frightening look at what could have happened if the Germans and Japanese had won WW2. I watched season 1 in preparation for season 2, which I just finished. I can't wait for season 3.

Posted Image

Lou

#3254 OpanaPointer

OpanaPointer

    I Point at Opana

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,448 posts

Posted 13 January 2017 - 02:17 AM

Just saw "Passengers" with that guy and that gal. Visually excellent, plot not surprising but still fun. Happily, Boss Lady and I were  the only people in the theater, so I could provide additional dialog when the actors weren't yapping. 


"One of our King Tigers could take five of your Shermans, but you always had six of them."


WWII Resources. Primary sources.
The Myths of Pearl Harbor. Demythologizing the attack.
Hyperwar. Hypertext history of the Second World War.
Pearl Harbor Attack Message Board
Veteran: USN, 1969-1989

#3255 André7

André7

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 392 posts
  • LocationMontreal, Canada

Posted 13 January 2017 - 10:20 AM

 Which one was is? I am still searching for the films about this story.

 

To my knowledge there are three films and one mini-series about this event; 1) Tokyo Trial (Tôkyô saiban) a documentary from 1983, 2) The Tokyo Trial (Dong Jing shen pan) from 2006, 3) Tokyo Trial from 2007, and 4) Tokyo Trial, a mini-series from 2016.

The miniseries. Available on Netflix.



#3256 André7

André7

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 392 posts
  • LocationMontreal, Canada

Posted 14 January 2017 - 08:45 AM

Just watched "Yükoku" by Yukio Mishima (1966) about the ritual suicides of Lt Shinji Takeyama and his wife Reiko. It's a short (30 minute) film in black and white done in the style of Nö theater. Very disturbing on several levels. I don't recommend it for the faint of heart.

 

First because of the gore. The protagonist kneeling in a pool of his blood,  holding his guts with one hand while he shoves his sword through his own neck is not something I was expecting.

 

Second because Mishima himself plays the part of Takeyama. Knowing as I did that he killed himself the same way in an act of ritual suicide only four years later held a morbidity that put me off a little.

 

That said- the first half of the movie is beautiful. A deeply sensual interplay of movement. light and darkness, music and form as the husband and wife make love for the last time.

 

The dvd extras include interviews from the time with Mishima on the end of the war, Japanese militarism, death, etc. He was an 18 year old factory worker when he heard the words of the emperor announcing the surender to the allies. He expected the world to end, but instead he just sat in a park looking up at the tree branches swaying in the wind. And life went on.



#3257 Phantom of the Ruhr

Phantom of the Ruhr

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 401 posts

Posted 15 January 2017 - 01:48 AM

My DVD copy of Attack on the Iron Coast. 


"We'll settle this the old navy way: first guy to die, loses."
-Thomas "Tug" Benson, Hot Shots! Part Deux.


#3258 WW2HistoryGal

WW2HistoryGal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
  • LocationNebraska

Posted 15 January 2017 - 06:23 PM

We're in the midst of an ice storm here in Nebraska, so we're housebound for the next two days. I'm not worried - I've got TCM (Turner Classic Movies) on. Next up: Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, one of my favorites. And then All About Eve is on. 


  • André7 likes this

Author of Nebraska POW Camps: World War II Prisoners of War in the Heartland / Available from The History Press and Amazon.com

My World War 2 Reviews Blog: Best of World War 2


#3259 WW2HistoryGal

WW2HistoryGal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
  • LocationNebraska

Posted 17 January 2017 - 09:32 PM

Season 4 finale of Sherlock


Author of Nebraska POW Camps: World War II Prisoners of War in the Heartland / Available from The History Press and Amazon.com

My World War 2 Reviews Blog: Best of World War 2


#3260 Poppy

Poppy

    grasshopper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,272 posts
  • LocationShambhala http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hv9DwzU3KP0

Posted 17 January 2017 - 10:30 PM

Not sure if season 4- but...was disappointed. Sherlocks sister- so many nutty points.

-The opening, where he has the sword, no smart guy would be fooled by little girl/clown.

3 guys drop outside on ropes. Sherlock has to make individual deductions...How did she manage to recruit men to rope them up and drop/cut them.

Final episode stretched things too far.

Just like hollywood- unhappy endings...


XX


#3261 WW2HistoryGal

WW2HistoryGal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
  • LocationNebraska

Posted 18 January 2017 - 02:14 AM

Not sure if season 4- but...was disappointed. Sherlocks sister- so many nutty points.

-The opening, where he has the sword, no smart guy would be fooled by little girl/clown.

3 guys drop outside on ropes. Sherlock has to make individual deductions...How did she manage to recruit men to rope them up and drop/cut them.

Final episode stretched things too far.

Just like hollywood- unhappy endings...

 

Yes, that was Season 4. It wasn't nearly as good as the first three. I think it's because they had massive expectations from everyone to make this the Best.Season.Ever. And they failed. They took the essence of the show - Sherlock and Watson solving mysteries - and turned it upside down. That being said, they could re-right the ship if done properly, or they could make it worse. But if they decided to end it, I could live with such an ending, where all the threads are neatly tied up.


Author of Nebraska POW Camps: World War II Prisoners of War in the Heartland / Available from The History Press and Amazon.com

My World War 2 Reviews Blog: Best of World War 2


#3262 Poppy

Poppy

    grasshopper

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,272 posts
  • LocationShambhala http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hv9DwzU3KP0

Posted 18 January 2017 - 02:21 AM

Some great writing. ..Not a big Cucumber Hatchback fan.


XX


#3263 Belasar

Belasar

    Court Jester

  • Administrators
  • 7,442 posts

Posted 18 January 2017 - 03:57 AM

To be honest each season has been a departure from the previous one if you think about it.

 

Season One was pretty much a solve the mystery series. Season Two was in the end all about Moriarty. Season Three revolved around Mary and Season Four was about setting things back to square one in effect. The one thing about the 3rd episode was its lack of humor. Only the Mrs. Hudson's bits were intentionally funny, but then after the death of Mary they really could not go there, could they.

 

Mark Gatiss (Mycroft) as co-creator had a interesting comment about the 4th season and a possible 5th season. All previous incarnations of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson (original books and early films) showed them as much older men, set in their ways and the first four series was intended to show how they became those men. In the final montage the end shows them exiting the 'Rathbone' building showing how they would move in that direction.

 

the 'Final Problem' was intended to show Sherlock as finally becoming human rather than pure intellect. Not as smart as Mycroft or his sister, but stronger for finally accepting his humanity.

 

He also said that all participants are keen on a 5th season, but scheduling is a major problem, especially Cumberbatch.


Wars are rarely fought in black and white, but in infinite shades of grey

(Poppy is occasionaly correct, or so I hear)


#3264 WW2HistoryGal

WW2HistoryGal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
  • LocationNebraska

Posted 18 January 2017 - 04:49 PM

Some great writing. ..Not a big Cucumber Hatchback fan.

 

I love his work. In fact, in October 2015, my daughter and I went to England to see him perform in Hamlet. He did an amazing job. 


Author of Nebraska POW Camps: World War II Prisoners of War in the Heartland / Available from The History Press and Amazon.com

My World War 2 Reviews Blog: Best of World War 2


#3265 WW2HistoryGal

WW2HistoryGal

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 139 posts
  • LocationNebraska

Posted 18 January 2017 - 04:54 PM

To be honest each season has been a departure from the previous one if you think about it.

 

Season One was pretty much a solve the mystery series. Season Two was in the end all about Moriarty. Season Three revolved around Mary and Season Four was about setting things back to square one in effect. The one thing about the 3rd episode was its lack of humor. Only the Mrs. Hudson's bits were intentionally funny, but then after the death of Mary they really could not go there, could they.

 

Mark Gatiss (Mycroft) as co-creator had a interesting comment about the 4th season and a possible 5th season. All previous incarnations of Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson (original books and early films) showed them as much older men, set in their ways and the first four series was intended to show how they became those men. In the final montage the end shows them exiting the 'Rathbone' building showing how they would move in that direction.

 

the 'Final Problem' was intended to show Sherlock as finally becoming human rather than pure intellect. Not as smart as Mycroft or his sister, but stronger for finally accepting his humanity.

 

He also said that all participants are keen on a 5th season, but scheduling is a major problem, especially Cumberbatch.

 

Yes, I had read an interview with Gatiss where he talked about this. And I agree 100% with what you said. I think Gatiss said that now Sherlock is the Basil Rathbone Sherlock.

 

I still enjoyed Season 4, but some of it was too bizarre. For example, the second episode with the villain, Culverton Smith, really didn't reveal who he had killed and how Sherlock came to the conclusion that he was a serial killer. That was a bit of a stretch. And the way it was filmed...I get that Sherlock was supposed to be so strung out on drugs that reality and hallucination sort of blended together. But it was hard to watch - not in terms of content, but that there was too many weird camera angles and things of that nature.

 

As always, though, I will need to go back and rewatch them in order to pick up on little nuances. Gatiss and his team are so brilliant in terms of writing and production that each episode is chock full of things you miss the first time 'round.


Author of Nebraska POW Camps: World War II Prisoners of War in the Heartland / Available from The History Press and Amazon.com

My World War 2 Reviews Blog: Best of World War 2


#3266 LRusso216

LRusso216

    Graybeard

  • ModeratorsOKF Moderator
  • 12,229 posts
  • LocationPennsylvania

Posted Yesterday, 01:50 AM

I've been in and out on the Sherlock series. I watched Season 1 but I'm not sure what other shows I've watched. I did see Episode 2 of the current season today in fact. It was confusing to say the least. I guess I'll watch the other episodes eventually, but I much prefer the original stories in book form. I'd rather read than watch TV. I have a hard time suspending my disbelief. I'm always aware that the are just actors playing a role. Probably one reason I don't watch much TV or movies.


Posted Image

Lou

#3267 Belasar

Belasar

    Court Jester

  • Administrators
  • 7,442 posts

Posted Yesterday, 12:21 PM

Sherlock straddles the format of TV series and Film. at 90 minutes it seems a film, but part of your confusion stems from that through out series 2-4 events in one episode often drives the narrative in following episodes. Miss one and the others become confusing.

 

Very different from the original source material which was in short story style. Doyle had a love-hate relationship with the character and it showed in his writings. He was frustrated that his other works never became as popular as his Sherlock Holmes and he went so far to kill off the character in his famous struggle with Moriarty. Eventually he resurrected Sherlock without much explanation because of calls for his return from the public, but often he was lazy about it. Many latter stories just peter out because Doyle just could not come up with a clever ending and he would close with 'well case was very perplexing and we never solved it'

 

the Sherlock creators frankly say that much of the original source material is just plain bad, especially the latter stories, but they have lifted small parts to insert into 'classic' stories to make the material their own. Sometimes its a character name, or a location or a throw away humorous scene. They know the material back and forth and really do love it all, good or bad.

 

Pretty much all of our conception about Sherlock Holmes comes from the Rathbone/Brett era films which took their own liberties.


Wars are rarely fought in black and white, but in infinite shades of grey

(Poppy is occasionaly correct, or so I hear)


#3268 André7

André7

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 392 posts
  • LocationMontreal, Canada

Posted Today, 03:47 AM

Are there any really good Italian-made WWII movies? I just watched "Little Cannon" yesterday. It was a weird little movie comedy that ends "en queue de poisson" (leaving you hanging). I tried three times to watch "The Battle of El Alamein" and " Hell In Normandy" but they keep getting stuck in my craw.

 

I remember fondly a movie I saw on television when I was a kid starring David Niven called "My Best enemy" which I re-watched last week. It's a cute piece of fluff but really leaves you unsatisfied. And then there's "Life Is Beautiful" which isn't really a military type movie. "Rome Open City" and "Paisan" are two movies I've heard good things about but haven't seen.

 

Can anybody recommend any others for me to seek out? I'm talking battle movies from an Italian point of view?






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users