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30th Cavalry Reconnaissance Troop (Mech) Timeline

Discussion in 'Western Europe 1943 - 1945' started by Slipdigit, Jun 11, 2014.

  1. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    The afternoon and evening before, the troop was tied up fighting at St Aquilin de Pacy and lost several men trying to take the town.

    24 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "Troop ordered to clean up resistence [sic] at St Aquilin de Pacy. That mission was accomplished. At 1530 troop was ordered to assemble in vicinity 181722 and be prepared to reconnoiter route for RCT 119 beginning at 0530 the following morning. At 1630 the 3rd platoon captured 9 prisoners of war at 305705."

    Journal:

    "0025 - Need 80 Infantry men for here and anything further north."
    "0145 - Received message stating infantry men on way."
    "0150 - Plan to give you MTED company from 117th Inf. Liaison to report to you, 0700. Will confirm later."
    Inbound message "0745 - When contact is established, send liaison officer back for outfit. You continue on original mission."
    0920 - 10 enemy observed on 119th at 0910, same vicinity that they were yesterday."
    Inbound 1025 - Continue to clean up, if you need help you will get it.
    inbound 1106 - Give report on situation.
    1120 - Patrol from 3 platoons is at Chateau, they reconnoitered all bridges in that vicinity. Germans have left patrol continuing along main highway and high ground, where they have no report from other patrols.

    The troop continued moving, setting up roadblocks and moving on.

    inbound "1530 - Stop present job, report your position, assemble troop without delay, vicinity 181722. Be prepared to reconnoiter to north at 0530. Send quartering detail and liaison officer to CO 119th Inf. at 175178. You will be attached to them."

    They continued moving and last report at 1904 was "CO at 305707"

    Anyone know what an MTED Company is?
     
  2. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    25 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "Troop attached to RTC [sic] 119 and given mission to reconnoiter route and establish roadblocks along their lines of advance. These roadblocks were held until relieved by the infantry. Troop ordered to set up roadblocks at 145954, 168938, and 189945 and hold for the night."

    "0900 - CO at 152848. Impractical to send messenger back. We are still moving."
    "1140 - CO at 167905"
    "2025 - Contact British and Canadian, tell them enemy has barrier at 294980, 298983, which they will blow night [sic]. it affects height Seine River 3 meters, have them to prevent if possible. All clear at 2593 at 1700.
    "0957 - We are moving with Crisis (119th), Quartering party has departed."

    Here is the track of the 30th Recon, showing location up through 30 Aug.

    View attachment 21267

    The location of the "barriers" mention in the 2025 entry of the Journal is shown here with decimal latitude/longitude indicated. Anyone have any idea what they were? I looked on Google trying to see if they were talking about a dam, weir, levee or something else? Any ideas?

    View attachment 21268


    Mr. Sanford stated that after Mortain, the troop was doing what they had trained to back in the States and in England. Throughout most of Normandy, due to the terrain and strength of the enemy resistance, the had fought mostly as transported light infantry, scouting on foot. Now, they were moving ahead of the division briefly engaging, reporting and bypassing enemy strong-points. During this this time, he said though, those were few and far between that the Germans were mostly on the run.

    Here is the general situation at 1200 25 Aug 1944

    View attachment 21269
     

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  3. SirJahn

    SirJahn Member

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    MTED probably stands for mounted, meaning in trucks.
     
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  4. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I'll take that. Mr. Sanford said the infantry followed them in trucks across France until they ran out of fuel in Belgium.
     
  5. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    26 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "Troop relieved from mission at 0700 and ordered to assemble at 160890. At 1100 troop began to move to 560543 arriving at 1630."

    Journal has one entry:

    "0957 - We are moving with Crisis (119th), Quartering party has departed.

    See the map on post 102 I just added this morning.


    General situation 1200 this date.

    View attachment 21271
     

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  6. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    27 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "Troop remained in bivouac."

    Journal:

    No time given - "Troop in assembly area, Hocourt, awaiting orders."

    General situation 1200 27 Aug 1944

    View attachment 21270
     

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  7. Earthican

    Earthican Member

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    I wonder if it could be a floating bridge mis-identified as a "barrier", or, better yet, a submerged "floating" bridge. But I have not found any reference to a submerged bridge in use.

    http://www.canadiansoldiers.com/history/battlehonours/northwesteurope/seine1944.htm

     
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  8. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Sounds plausible, Earthican. Thanks for looking and commenting. The river appears wider there than downstream. I wonder if it is/was shoal waters there and that made it easier to maintain a bridge? Possibly it was wider and deeper, so the flow rate was slower, affecting pontoons or partially submerged bridge-works less?

    16,000 vehicles? That sounds like a lot, especially to not attract attention.
     
  9. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    28 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "At 1105 troop was attached to 120th Infantry and given mission to cross Siene [sic] River and reconnoiter along main road to Maulan. At 1300 enemy was contacted at 724610. E enlisted [sic] man was killed in this encounter. Resistence [sic] was cleaned up and troop continued on mission."

    Journal:

    Inbound message "1105 - Prepare to move. Sgt Gustofson is on his way."
    "1200 - Troop cleared Hocourt CP"
    "1300 - Encounted [sic] machine gun and small-arms fire and some mortar fire at 1300."
    inbound message "1318 - Halt, forward move - and assemble in specified area."
    "1456 - Where were we when we received the fire."
    "1600 - Troop attached to 120th Inf."

    I am pretty sure that the soldier killed was T/5 Merlyn Castner, but I cannot fully verify this completely with any official records. Mr. Sanford recalls that he died in Germany, but other accounts have his death as being in France or Belgium. I found an award for a PH for Castner in the 30th ID GO dated 18 Aug 1944. In the 30th Recon AAR, there was no mention of any WIAs or KIAs on that date, so I am thinking that maybe the 30 ID GO had a typographical error in the date. I tend to think that Merlyn Castner was awarded a posthumous Purple Heart for mortal wounds he received on 28 August 1944, not the 18th. I have found the graves of all but one of the 30th Recon KIAs on Find-A-Grave. Trooper Castner is the only one that apparently has not been recorded on that site. I have found him in the 1940 Census in Ohio, where he was living as a border with another family. He name is variously spelled Merlin in some records.

    Edit: I found the grave or at least a memorial to T/5 Merlyn Castner in Tontogany Cemetery, Tontogany, Ohio. b 25 Aug 1911 d 28 Aug 1944. I was able to find a photo of his headstone in an Ohio genealogical website and have added his information and the photo to Find-a-Grave. See also post 121 below for more information. Thanks Andy!

    The location "Maulan" mentioned in the AAR is actually Meulan-en-Yvelines. Maulan is near Luxembourg.

    Here is a map showing the movement of the 30th Recon in the later half of August after the fighting along the Seine River, the crossing and the beginning of the drive to Belgium. The red circle shows where I think T/5 Castner was killed (48.99954 1.88309). I am speculating that they crossed the river at Mantes-la-Jolie. Can anyone provide any commentary on this?

    View attachment 21277

    I left in the comment about Sgt Gustafson. Mr, Sanford recalls that he was liaison of sorts with divisional HQ and was well thought of by the men of the troop. Throughout the Journal entries of other dates, there are mentions of Sgt being en route back to the troop, which was then followed up by a move by the troop. Sgt Gustafson was mentioned a couple of times in the book by Mr. Sanford.
     

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  10. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    29 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "Troop given mission to reconnoiter along Siene [sic] River from Maulan to Maurecourt. 3 prisoners were captured by 2nd platoon at 1306 in vicinity of 795619. No enemy encountered up to that point."

    Journal:
    "1335 - All 3 platoons on road at 800627. CO is now ahead checking on situation." I think the time is incorrect for this entry.
    "1225 - 805628 3rd platoon heading east. 790620 2nd Platoon position, heading north."
    "1306 - 822627 1st platoon, 795619 2nd Platoon, 818608 3rd platoon. 3 PWs by 2nd platoon at its position at 1300."
    "1425 - 08300580 forward elements at 1015, will hold there until right and left flanks catch up." I think they added leading zeros to the coordinates as there are more numbers than usual.
    "1659 - Townsat [sic] 1817537, 830540, and 834544 clear 1635."

    Here is the general situation 1200 29 Aug 1944. The 30th ID has crossed the Seine River north of Paris and is about to begin the long drive to the Belgian border and the terrible night south of Tournai.

    View attachment 21282

    Mr. Sanford mentioned yesterday that he did not realize how close to Paris they were during this time. He remembers that it was along about here and again in Belgium that they drove off of their maps. The map used here from the Modified British System is Nord de Guerre, map VR.
     

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  11. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    30 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "Platoons were sent to Pontoise to clear town. Small enemy resistence [sic] was met and overcome. At Pontoise, troop was given new mission to reconnoiter routes northeast from Pontoise. Platoons held up for night at 969717. No enemy encountered up to that point."

    Journal:

    Inbound "1145 - Send platoon to Pontoise for an enemy situation there. Sounds of demolition indicate withdrawal.
    "1710 - 910671 2nd platoon position 1705
    "1725 - 915674 2nd platoon reports road-block, they are clearing it and going ahead."
    Inbound "1912 - Put all of your unit in front of Custom." [120th IR]
    "2025 - 969717 2nd platoon."

    Circled locations are stop and stop location for the day.

    View attachment 21283
     

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  12. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    31 Aug 1944

    AAR:

    "Mission for the day was zone reconnaissance to the northeast of 969717. At 1515 orders were received to stop zone reconnaissance and continue mission of route reconnaissance. Enemy was contacted at Cramoisy, One enemy 1/2 ton and mortar were knocked-out. 2nd platoon encountered small enemy patrol at 150862, drove them off and continued on mission. At 2035 at 113898 the 3rd platoon knocked out one enemy cycle and captured 2 prisoners. At 2300 orders were received to perform route reconnaissance for entire division beginning at 01/0530. Orders issued to platoons to assemble at Cromoisy to prepare for mission. On way to assembly area, 3rd platoon knocked out enemy half-track and crew of 10 men at 158938."

    Journal:
    "0950 - Pl 10 crossed b 2nd platoon on river route at 0930." I think the river is the Therain.
    "1010 - We started at 0915, 2nd platoon crossed Pl14 at 1000, 1st platoon crossed Pl10 at 1000."
    Several messages notifying locations and phase lines reached.
    "1420 - 092846 1st Platoon, 112814 2nd platoon, 076868 3rd Plat."
    More locations, etc.
    "1545 - 1st platoon on final phase line."
    "1555 - Vicinity Cramoisy 1st platoon has knocked out one enemy 1/4 ton, and mortar. Still fighting. Details as soon as possible."
    "1610 - We are moving and tied up in traffic, have given platoons new objectives, when we halt will obtain maps."
    Inbound "1640 - Report on bridges and enemy situation northeast of river."
    "1745 - Trains moved to 088828."
    "1835 - 2nd platoon drove 10 enemy at 150862, and proceeded on mission. Slowed down by road obstacles."
    "2034 - CN bridge at 178872 good up to 10 tons."
    "2034 - At 2030 3rd platoon met enemy cycle."
    There was more movement by the troop and apparently they had moved further than the division wanted to move.
    "2344 - 158938 was 3rd platoons [sic] position, they have already started pulling back. Knocked out German half-track and crew of ten at 2340."

    View attachment 21284

    For those of you who have read the book, I am thinking that along in here was where the encounter Mr. Sanford had with the little French girl and the cheese crackers occurred. Looking at the street view, there are a good many houses along this route and he said they had been moving a great deal when this event transpired.
     

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  13. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    1 Sep 1944

    AAR:

    "Troop given mission to guard flanks of task force on 150 mile move. No enemy was contacted by elements of this troop until 1730 when the 1st and 2nd Platoons on the right flank contacted an enemy force at Champien (480-330). 50 enemy were killed and 66 were captured, without a casualty to our unit. Four wagon-loads of German miscellaneous equipment were captured and turned over to the FFI at that point.
    The 3rd Platoon, who had mission of protecting left flank, engaged an enemy artillery bivouac at 1930, two miles south-southeast of Pevianne (577575). AT this point 5 emplaced 88mm, 4 anti-aircraft guns, 1 aircraft sound and sight detector and 1 vehicle were captured and destroyed. 6 of the enemy were killed and 2 were captured. One of our enlisted men was wounded.
    At 2200, the 1st Platoon established a roadblock at Doingt (578580). 2 prisoners of war and 1 light vehicle were captured at this point at 2400. This roadblock was occupied throughout the night."

    The Journal follows the AAR closely and added nothing additional, except for one thing. The Journal shows the events of the 3rd Platoon described in the second paragraph above as happening the next morning, 2 Sep 1944 between 0545 and 0630 instead of the night prior. Since the Journal was kept real time and the AAR was dated 30 days later, I tend to think the dates on the Journal are correct. Also, there was a change of command coming up the next day due to the wounding of the CO, Capt. Cornelius. The AAR for August and September were both signed by Lt. James Hume (later captain).

    Does anyone know who actually typed the AAR? Was it a clerk or Cornelius/Hume themselves? Was it the XO? I do notice a change in the depth of information contained in the AAR after the change in command in early September, 1944.

    1st Lt Raymond L. Flanner earned a Silver Star for his actions this date.
    "First Lieutenant Raymond L. Flander [sic], 01031638, Cavalry, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 1 September 1944, in France. Lieutenant Flanner was commanding a platoon of reconnaissance troop engaged in sustained offensive against the enemy. During an advance the platoon encountered an enemy force in strongly defended position. It was impossible to bypass the enemy for all the roads were mined. Without hesitation, Lieutenant Flanner ordered his platoon to make a headlong attack o the enemy position to attempt to catch them by surprise. Lieutenant Flanner personally led the assault, riding the lead vehicle. So sudden was the attack, the enemy was caught unprepared, and as a result of Lieutenant Flanner's daring, sixty-six prisoners were captured and at least fifty of the enemy were killed. The indomitable fighting spirit displayed in the daring action is outstanding. Entered military service from Kansas.

    Mr. Sanford talked to Mr. Flanner several years ago, just a few months before the latter's death. They talked about the war and later, after Flanner's death, his wife called Mr. Sanford back and thanked him for talking to her husband. She was listening to their conversation and learned much of what her husband had done, since he had never talked to her about what had happened. She said that otherwise, she would have never known.

    1st Lt Chester H. Prentiss earned a Bronze Star for his actions this date.

    I do not know who the wounded soldier was.

    This maps shows the path of the 30 Recon through most of August 1944. They began a rapid movement NE as shown.

    View attachment 21296

    Here is the general situation map prepared by the US Army. As you can see, all of the US Third Army and a large portion of the US First Army is off of the map to the right. The British and Canadians are facing more organized resistance along the coast.

    View attachment 21297

    Tomorrow is going to be a bad day for the troop.
     

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  14. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    2 Sep 1944

    AAR:

    “No change in missions. At dawn the 2nd Platoon captured 3 enemy, killed 1, and wounded 1, vicinity of 620620. At 0600, three miles south of Pevianne (580565) the 1st Platoon killed 2 enemy and captured 3 enemy. Troop continued move and next enemy contact was made by 3rd Platoon at Cambrai. 5 prisoners of war were taken there at 1430. At Valenciennes, a small patrol of 9 enemy were encountered. 9 enemy were killed and 4 wagons of German supplies were captured and turned over to the FFI. Our casualties were 1 enlisted man slightly wounded. Upon completing this mission, the troop was immediately given the task of establishing a road-block 2 ½ miles east of Tournai (963983) 5 prisoners, 2 vehicles and 1 enemy motorcycle were captured at this point at 1830. At 2330 this road block was attacked by enemy wheel and track vehicles, supported by enemy infantry of unknown strength. Casualties of an unestimated [sic] number were inflected [sic] upon the enemy. The roadblock was forced to withdraw to high ground, 800 yards south of their position, where it was held through the night. Our losses at the roadblock were 2 M-8s damaged, on ¼ ton destroyed; 1 officer and 2 enlisted men killed, 2 officers (including Troop Commander) and 4 enlisted men wounded. At 2345 1st Lt. James Hume, Jr. assumed command of the troop.

    Journal:

    “0545 – 577,575 destroyed five 88’s [sic] and four Anti-aircraft guns.”
    “0600 – Captured 2 prisoners, vicinity 620,620.”
    “0615 – 580,565, captured 3 prisoners. Continuing on mission.”
    “0945 – We have pulled in are preparing to move north on right of axis.”
    “1015 – We are near Combria [sic]. Come up. Continue on mission from there.” I think the city is actually Cambrai
    “1350 – Have contacted enemy.”
    “1530 – Captured 5 prisoners.”
    “1535 – Nine enemy killed. Captured quantity of supply. Proceding [sic] on mission.”
    “1800 – Enemy contacted.”
    “1830 – 963,983. Captured 5 prisoners.”
    “2330 – 983,305 fire from west believed to friendly troops.”
    “2335 – 983-304 our position. Captain and others wounded. Reorganize as soon as possible.”
    “2345 – 1st Lt. James Hume assumed command.”

    A day of days for the troop.

    As indicated the, 30 Recon was leading the division on the drive into central Belgium, picking up prisoners and clearing towns. At 1830, a group rolled through Gaurain-Ramecroix, a few miles southeast of Tournai. Mr. Sanford was part of this group and they had a short running gun battle with a group of Germans that netted the 5 prisoners and two vehicles mentioned. They established a roadblock at the intersection of The Grand Route and Rue de Antoing but then quickly moved about one or two miles to the east and established another roadblock. He said that they were exhausted by then, having been awake and moving for the better part of 72 hours. Sanford further added that if the Germans had wanted to take them at the second roadblock, they could have because most of the men fell asleep as soon as they got the roadblock set.

    I have conflicting stories about what specifically happened at 2330, but they all pretty much state that the US forces mistook a German column coming from the west on Grand Route for the 125th Cavalry Recon Squadron. I think the US forces were a mixed group made up of part of the HQ Platoon and men and vehicles from the 3rd Platoon. At some point Capt. Cornelius fired (or threw) a recognition flare and was fired upon by the enemy. He tried to retreat through a hedge alongside the street with his driver but was badly wounded by machine gun fire.

    Killed were:
    1st Lt Frederick L. Haldiman, buried Epinal American Cemetery
    SSgt. Francis E. Scott, buried Riverdale UMC Cemetery, Riverdale, GA
    T/5 Walter E. Dennis, buried Williamsburg Presbyterian Cemetery, Kingstree, Williamsburg, SC

    I have not been able to determine who the wounded were in this engagement or in the engagement earlier. Sgt. Scott’s death was particularly hard on the troop as he was well thought of by the men. Mr. Sanford referred to him as the finest soldier he has ever known and other accounts I have found expressed the same sentiment. I am in contact with the son of Sgt. Scott, who lives in Georgia.

    Pvt. Howard W. Ochiltree earned a Silver Star.
    Citation – “Private Howard W. Ochiltree, 207433360, Cavalry, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 2 September 1944, in Belgium. Private Ochiltree was assigned to duty as a driver with a reconnaissance troop engaged in a fire fight with a stubbornly resisting foe. During the engagement, Private Ochiltree voluntarily manned a machine gun and remained at the gun until it was knocked out of action by enemy fire. He was ordered to withdraw to a sheltered position. While on his way he heard the cry of a wounded comrade, and with complete disregard for his own safety, made his way back in the face of continuing heavy fire and evacuated the wounded man to a position of comparative safety behind a building. After dressing his comrade’s wounds, he remained at his side to guard him until the next day when he was evacuated by medical personnel. The personal courage and unselfish loyalty exhibited by Private Ochiltree reflect great credit on himself and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces. Entered military service from Iowa.”

    In the face of superior numbers and unable to recover from the mis-identification of enemy troops, the men of the roadblock withdrew, as mention in the AAR entry. From reading Pvt. Ochiltree’s Silver Star citation and talking to his widow, apparently he and the unnamed wounded man stayed behind until US control of the intersection was reestablished the next day. Private Ochiltree’s wife stated that he said he was never so scared in his life as he was that night. Pvt. Ochiltree was later wounded, but was with the unit at war’s end. He died in 2000 and was survived by his wife and children.

    September 2nd. 1944 was a pivotal day for the 30th Reconnaissance Troop due the assumption of command by Lt. Hume. He was almost universally loved by the men of the troop. Every account I have found that mentions Capt. Hume speaks of him in the highest regard. I have been in contact with his daughter, who lives in Georgia and indirectly his wife who lives in Kentucky. They have provided photos and other information on Lt. Hume, including a recording made by The Army Hour, a radio program, made 22 March 1945 on the eve of the crossing of the Rhine. In it, Captain Hume is interviewed about the reconnaissance the troop performed on the east bank of the Rhine prior to the forced crossing. It does not provide a lot of detail, but I can hear the exhaustion in his voice as he tried to answer the reporter’s questions without actually telling him anything of value.

    I have seen a morning report for this day, although I do not have it in my possession. The unit was down to around 120 men (TO&E calls for 154) and SITREP for 6 September shows only 6 M-8s in service out of a normal complement of 10.

    Here is a map showing locations this date and later

    View attachment 21303

    Here is a map showing the area at Gaurain-Ramecroix, where the firefight at the crossroads took place.

    View attachment 21304

    The yellow pin shows the location of the memorial plaque and the general area where the roadblock was and the fight occurred. The red star shows where the group retreated to after they were pushed off of the roadblock. Mr Sanford's second roadblock was to the east, closer to the body of water but he cannot recall exactly where it was.

    Here is the memorial at the intersection.

    View attachment 21305

    We will be visiting this memorial in our travels later this month.

    Judging by this map and maps for later days, I suspect the German forces they engaged were 21st Panzer Division's reconnaissance.

    View attachment 21311
     

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  15. AMS7

    AMS7 New Member

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    My dad (Martin J. Smith, then James I. Mitchell, Jr.) was a member of the 2nd Platoon and was close enough to Capt Cornelius at 2330 to see and hear what was going on. The troops ahead of them began to fire and Captain Cornelius shouted something close to "Stop it, that's the 113th"! Many men responded by yelling back, "No! No! It's the "Krouts!" (sorry if that's offensive, I was just trying to be accurate) As Captain Cornelius stepped out to release the flare, he was hit by fire from a "Burp" gun. As you may know this was a slang term Americans gave a hand held German weapon that fired at a high rate of speed because of the way it sounded. Smith backed up his jeep and 2 soldiers placed Captain Cornelius in the rear. Smith than gave Cpt. Cornelius 2 tablets, sprinkled sulfa powder in his wound to prevent bacterial infection, and used the bandage he had from his first aid kit (they all had these on their belts) to wrap the wound. He then drove him back to the First Aid Station to receive medical attention. Dad does not recall how far of a drive that was, but does recall there was firing all the way back and that it was going over his head. You could tell it was German fire because every 8th or 10th round (somewhere around there) was a flare that was white. American fire had rounds every so often that were a light orange. This is one of the distinctions that was used to identify troops.

    This was only the 2nd time that dad recalled Captain Cornelius being near the front. The other was at St. Jean De Daye where the gallant action of Captain Cornelius' that was described in Post #81 is accurate of what he recalls from that day.
     
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  16. AMS7

    AMS7 New Member

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    Dad recalls Pvt Howard W. Ochiltree on a more personal level. Pvt. Ochiltree was the guy that could get you things. He said it was amazing the amount of things you would see when he opened up his jacket.
     
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  17. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    03 Sep 1944

    "Troop relieved from roadblock mission at 1100 and moved to Bruvelle Belgium 953265"

    The Journal entries were minimal, but the name of town they were in was spelled correctly - Bruyelle. The village was a few miles SW of the previous day's fight at the crossroads.

    I don't know if Recon was using the wrong map, wrong grid coordinates or if EchoDelta is rendering incorrect information, but the locations cited in the AAR are incorrect. The grid coordinates for 2 September showed the fight at the crossroads as being on the other side of Tournai near Lille. The grid coordinates for today showed their bivouac to be well over in eastern Belgium, near Maastricht, which was not possible at this point. Thankfully, the AAR or Journal list village names, so I am able to find the correct locations.

    Also clarification regarding 125th Cavalry and 113th Cavalry mentioned in the posts above. The 125th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron and the 113th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron were part of the 113th Cavalry Group.
     
  18. Ruud

    Ruud Member

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    Location:
    Maastricht Netherlands
    I had the same problems with thos grid coordinates. Sometimes they get close to the places the AAR show, mostly the grids refer to someplace offmap/ impossible.
    Recon is now close to enter Holland...Nice Job Jeff. Are you going to post a sort off total map at end of AAR?
     
  19. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Probably, I haven't thought about it but that is a good idea.
     
  20. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    4 Sep 1944

    AAR:

    "Troop in bivouac at 953265."

    Journal:

    no time given - "Troop in bivouac 953,265. Reorganization due to losses."

    SITREP (Situation Report):
    Line F "7 M-8s ready to roll."
     

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