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Bagpipes in Battle

Discussion in 'Military Training, Doctrine, and Planning' started by Slipdigit, Aug 18, 2010.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    There's an expression here- "We're all Jock (John) Tamson (Thompson's) Bairns"-ie we're all the same.
    It probably comes from that.
     
  2. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

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  3. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Here's a nice clip of the Edinburgh Military Tattoo opening in 2008.
    [YOUTUBE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OpVfBenW60&feature=related[/YOUTUBE]
     
  4. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Cheers Lou.
    Managed to get to the Tattoo once, back in '85. It was some sight. :cool:
     
  5. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

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    Blimey, there aint many Scots in that lot...They're all Nepalese and Canadian....Dont the Scots get the pipes anymore....No got it....As an Irish piper once said to me....How do you know a bagpipes out of tune....Theres a Scotsman playing it....boom boom..
     
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  6. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    Thanks for clearing up the story about why Scotsmen are called Jocks. It all makes sense now. I think.

    Ok now, what's the deal with going "regimental" under those kilts? In the wintertime too?
     
  7. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Of course! :D
     
  8. sonofacameron

    sonofacameron Member

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    You mean the Camerons (Queens Own Cameron Highlanders) there were no Cameronians in 51st Highland Division.
     
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  9. urqh

    urqh Tea drinking surrender monkey

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  10. DocCasualty

    DocCasualty Member

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    As is often said by wearers of the kilt, "if I wore underwear, then it would be a skirt!"

    If you've never worn the kilt it probably doesn't make much sense, but going regimental is very comfortable, even in the winter. If fact, it then becomes pretty uncomfortable to wear anything under it (except for hose and brogues!) if you're not used to it.

    Back to the original question posed and I suppose already answered, it was the excess number of pipers KIA in WWI that lead to the proscription against their active use in battle in WWII. Another instance of "more like guidelines than actual rules" as noted previously.

    Perhaps OT but SlipDigit wondered why the US didn't use such a powerful motivator as martial music on the battlefield. I don't pretend to know the answer to that but having recently watched Ken Burn's The Civil War, I was reminded that both Union and CSA units did use brass bands during various battles of the ACW, though I don't know of any instances after that conflict. I surmise that most everyone concluded what the British did after WWI that it no longer fit the model of modern warfare as the musicians were now too vulnerable.

    To my knowledge, the use of the pipes in the RSR is strictly for ceremonial purposes which still includes day to day activities such as call to mess, etc. I'd be curious to hear of any battlefield uses that have crept in though and don't think I would be too surprised to hear that is the case!
     

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