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Linguistic funnies

Discussion in 'The Members Lounge' started by GP, Oct 28, 2004.

  1. GP

    GP New Member

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    Now is the time to put your linguistic funnies to the board.
     
  2. Roel

    Roel New Member

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  3. trackpin

    trackpin New Member

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    post subject

    Is the one above the war report with subtitles?
    try this, record is supposed to be 82mtrs.
    <www.wagenschenke.ch>
     
  4. trackpin

    trackpin New Member

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  5. Roel

    Roel New Member

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    Hardly a linguistic joke is it? By the way, this little game can also be found on the root site of the movie above:

    www.ebaumsworld.com
     
  6. Christian Ankerstjerne

    Christian Ankerstjerne Member

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    Re: post subject

    I've got 88 meters...
     
  7. Roel

    Roel New Member

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    I could think of a few unpleasant jokes here... :grin:

    "Yes, but then, you're used to it."
    "What, in reality or in this game?"
    "88 meters of what?"
    "That's just the beer talking! Don't brag!"

    :lol:
     
  8. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    A linguistic joke?

    A Frenchman stays at an English hotel. In the morning, the waiter asks him what he wants for his breakfast. Cereal? Toast? Full English Breakfast?
    Non! A single boiled egg.
    Every morning the French guest asks for the same breakfast - a single boiled egg. Eventually, the waiter summons up the courage to ask him why he never has anything more. The Frenchman replies:
    "Because Monsuir, un eouf is un eouf"
    :D
    (apologies if my French spelling is wrong!)
     
  9. Simonr1978

    Simonr1978 New Member

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    In Britain if you wanted a cigarette you might ask for a "fag", if you tried the same in the US you would probably get something very different!
     
  10. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    You want real 'linguistic funny' -

    me trying to talk German. Now that is funny! :lol:
     
  11. Roel

    Roel New Member

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    Go ahead punk... Make my day.

    I guess you saw that coming. :grin:
     
  12. Skua

    Skua New Member

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    A conversation between a ROK officer, calling for US tank and artillery support, and an American liaison officer during the Korean War :

    - "Please, please, you must fire now. There are many, many Chinese in front of me now."

    - "How many Chinese have you got ?"

    - "There are many, many, MANY Chinese!"

    Each time the Korean was asked for a precise estimate he simply added one more 'many'. Exasperated, the liaison officer demanded to speak to the unit American adviser.

    - "That goddam gook," stormed the liaison officer, "how many 'chinks' you got there ?"

    To this came the reply: "Hell, Captain - we got a goddam pisspot full!"

    With a parting "Why the hell couldn´t that gook have said so?" the liaison officer ordered the tanks and artillery into action.

    From "Armour of the Korean War 1950-53" by Simon Dunstan.
     
  13. Roel

    Roel New Member

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    In "A bridge too far" it is described how British regimental names drove American radio operators completely crazy. They were signalled abbreviations like DCLI (Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry) and felt they had to find out what that meant before passing it on, so as not to cause confusion down the line of communication.

    In this particular message, it ended up as "Duck Craft Landing Infantry". :lol:
     
  14. Ricky

    Ricky New Member

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    Similar to Roel's is the reported use by the RAF of the following 'code' in the Gulf War:

    Ground Controller: Report your position

    Pilot: Flying over MMBD

    This puzzled the Americans no end, until they were told that it stood for 'Miles & Miles of Bloody Desert'!

    Similar to Skua's is the English-American culture gap experienced (either in WW2 or in Korea, can't remember which). An English unit was pinned down, and needed help. They radioed in. The American on the other end asked how bad it was. The reply was:
    'A bit sticky'
    Every Englishman would know that this means:
    "We're in deep s**t"
    Obviously the American did not know this, and assumed they were not too badly off! After repeated calls for help, the British officer finally described the situation, and help was sent...
     

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