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Red Army Cossack Song

Discussion in 'Eastern Europe October 1939 to February 1943' started by JeffinMNUSA, Jan 29, 2010.

  1. JeffinMNUSA

    JeffinMNUSA Member

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  2. Owen

    Owen O

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  3. JeffinMNUSA

    JeffinMNUSA Member

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    Wes;
    Well other than the "Lili Marlene" (YouTube - Nina Hagen & Nana Mouskouri - Lili Marlene English version; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IzbqPy-0L-Y ) I don't see where the other side has much to even compare. Perhaps the German propaganda DEPT was too rigid and controlling (not to mention tasteless)? Prove me wrong. At any rate I rate the Russian tunes of the Great Patriotic War as some of the finest ever produced. How did the music of the time effect Soviet morale? Well read the Michael Jones Leningrad account about the time of the Shostakovich symphony.
    JeffinMNUSA
    PS. American tunes about the time of the Civil War and Western expansion are also something special. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Veyl_s1Y-x4
    PSS. Serbian tunes are great; http://www.jahu.net/video/video/Dc0...ata/Spremte_se_spremte_Cetnici_VRSF_BOYS.html
    THis one goes back to 1908.
     
  4. Volga Boatman

    Volga Boatman Dishonorably Discharged

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    Russian classical music, particularly the better known composers, is famous for it's stirring quality and deep impression it makes upon the listener. Agree with above posters that their music rates as the most stirring, most sorrowful and the most heartfelt of any of the participants of WW2.

    Maybe Barbarossa could have been fought in the orchestral pit first. German composers finding themselves outclassed may well have carried the bad news far and wide, saving a lot of lives, time and material by coming to the agreement that Russia, like it's music, was not to be defeated.

    Pity that politicians don't solve their paternalistiic squabbling in this manner. It would be a much better world if they did.
     
  5. JeffinMNUSA

    JeffinMNUSA Member

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    Good morning Volga;
    The Russian folk music of the era was also the best. An account from the Michael Jones Stalingrad book has it that someone on the Soviet side of the line was playing a phonograph on his side of the line during the battle. "Hey Russki!" came a call from the German side. "Play Katyusha!" The shooting died down as the Lidiya Ruslanova tune was played. YouTube - Катюша Katyusha Once done the battle started up again.
    More Lidiya Ruslanova; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ETRGp4Q0Ni8
    JeffinMNUSA
     
  6. Volga Boatman

    Volga Boatman Dishonorably Discharged

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    Sven Hassel, in his original book "Legion of the Damned" featured a Russian propaganda 'show'. Beginning with a screen set up on the soviet side of the lines, the Russians showed their German opponents first a very explicit pornographic film that ended just as it was getting interesting, followed by a movie of people eating exhorbitant amounts of food.....then followed this with an "Artillery Orchestra" that bombarded the German lines successively( with musical accompanyment) rising to a crescendo as the calibre of the shells falling got bigger, for a finale on the "Stalin Organ" that Sven said "left us cowering in abject TERROR, mixed with the screams of the wounded, the prayers of the desperate and the sobbing of men that couldn't take anymore."...

    Whether this is fiction or not is up to the reader.

    But Russian propaganda used music quite extensively and creatively from my readings of the period.
     
  7. JeffinMNUSA

    JeffinMNUSA Member

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    Good Morning Volga;
    Well Russki seemed to be able to spot and utilize REAL TALENT.
    Case in point the composer Alexander Alexandrov-who composed this immortal classic literally on the spur of moment in the darkest hour ;
    YouTube - Вставай страна огромная...

    A SONG THAT TRAVELLED ALL THE WAY TO BERLIN

    A popular wartime song called "The Holy War" by composer and conductor Alexander Alexandrov, a native of the small village of Plakhino near Ryazan, a regional center south of Moscow, inspired people to fight the Nazis in the years of the Great Patriotic War. The war broke out on June 22nd,1941 and two days later the "Izvestia" publishers gave Alexandrov a poem by Lebedev-Kumach, which was called "The Holy War". By the evening the song was ready and by the night it was sung by an ensemble. A few days later it was performed in front of soldiers leaving for the front. "Rise up, ye, mighty land of ours, rise up for deadly fight".

    Many years later witnesses of the event recalled what a strong impression the song had produced, its every word as if cast out of metal. The ensemble that performed it was the famous Soviet Army Song and Dance Ensemble, which won tremendous popularity both in this country and abroad. From the day it was formed in 1928 the ensemble was headed by Alexander Alexandrov. It traveled a lot giving concerts on the fronts and the soldiers were always looking forward to the concerts. A resident of a small Ryazan village Kuzma Kadantsev has preserved a good memory of wartime meetings with the ensemble. Kadantsev, a mortar man in wartime, was wounded several times but kept coming back to fight on. The commanders praised highly Sergeant Kadantsev's courage and military performance as he fought under Moscow, Stalingrad, in Ukraine and took part in the Battle of Berlin, which his battery was one of the first to enter. On several occasions he had an opportunity to listen to the Alexandrov ensemble and every time the ensemble performed "The Holy War".

    For the last time Kuzma Kadantsev enjoyed the song in 1946 in Berlin, where he served for some time after the war. During that tour Alexander Alexandrov died and the ensemble was taken over by his son Boris, who led it for 20 years. Our correspondent met with Kuzma Kadantsev in his quiet village on a warm spring day. An old age pensioner in his late 80s, the old soldier is still full of life and vigour. Reminiscent of the past battles are numerous orders and medals and he still loves wartime songs. "The Holy War", - Kadantsev says, - is the song of songs, a soldier's guide that accompanied us to Berlin. It is still dear to every war veteran".


    Soviet intelligence was also much better than the German; case in point the Stalingrad counteroffensive which caught the Axis totally by surprise.
    Did the pornographic film scenario mentioned above really happen? I am guessing that it very well might have. It might have been a psywar experiment of some kind and in that struggle for National existence all the stops were being pulled out. The fact that it was only done once points to the fact that it might have been deemed a failure... or possibly that Soviet intell just wanted the story to be making the rounds in the enemy camp. "Sent to their maker with fresh porno on their minds."
    JEffinMNUSA
     

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