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The CCKW air compressor truck

Discussion in 'Allied Military vehicles used during WWII' started by T. A. Gardner, Aug 9, 2022.

  1. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    While most people who've studied WW 2 for a while have seen photos of the CCKW air compressor truck, it isn't a well-known vehicle in detail.
    The truck was a common engineering vehicle for the US military and actually a very useful one.

    [​IMG]
    This is a good photo that illustrates many of it's features. There is the large Le Roi air compressor mounted on the bed. This provided 105 cu ft. of air at 100 psi per minute stored in the tank between the two hose reels on the back of the truck. The tank is fitted to allow two additional hoses to be fitted, but this appears to be unusual in use.
    Ahead of the compressor between it and the cab is a tool chest with extending workbench (extended here) for servicing the vehicle and tools on it.
    The two panner boxes on either side of the compressor held a selection of heavy duty pneumatic tools for use with the compressor. These included:

    A 24" two-man chainsaw
    Several pneumatic hammers for digging and demolition work with a variety of bits that could be fitted
    A pneumatic 12" circular saw
    A pneumatic nail driver for large nails like tree spikes
    A two-man drilling unit
    A rock drill
    A pneumatic diaphragm pump
    A sump pump
     
    Biak, Otto and Carronade like this.
  2. Carronade

    Carronade Ace

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    This and some of the other vehicles you've been posting must have been the envy of every other army.
     
  3. Ricky

    Ricky Well-Known Member

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    There are quite a few of these in museums. Presumably they survived because of their usefulness
     

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