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The WW2 beer thread!

Discussion in 'Living History' started by Skipper, Jun 17, 2016.

  1. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    I like the pic in Owen's post #17. Cpl Durant with his dirty pants and beat up boots. Just a working man having a beer and a smoke after a hard days work. Too bad he's from Wisconsin, though. :cool:
     
  2. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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  3. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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  4. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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  5. Emily McGrory

    Emily McGrory New Member

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    Can anyone tell me what kind of beer that is?
     

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  6. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    Looks like Rheingold to me.
     
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  7. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  8. sonofacameron

    sonofacameron Member

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    One or two slightly irreverent adverts for you.
     

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  9. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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  10. gtblackwell

    gtblackwell Well-Known Member

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    Did they use a Panzer Faust to open the kegs? I thought there would be a big spew.
     
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  11. P. Namio

    P. Namio New Member

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    Probably Morotai, late May 1945, US Navy photographers and printers, liberty party from USS Rocky Mount AGC3. What's the beer, anybody?
    Beach Party_Beer_people_WEB_WM_002.jpg
     
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  12. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    There were a few Standard Brewing Companies. One was in Rochester, NY, and another in Cleveland, OH.
     
  13. Terry D

    Terry D Well-Known Member

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    That's Erin Brew from Standard Brewing in Cleveland.
     
  14. Terry D

    Terry D Well-Known Member

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    Club Lager airmen.jpg Club Lager again.jpg Sometimes troops got beer from home, but often they had to get by on the local product. Here are some GI's (mostly airmen) in West Africa drinking Club Lager, a popular local brew in the Gold Coast. The Gold Coast is now Ghana, and they still make Club Lager there.
     
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  15. Terry D

    Terry D Well-Known Member

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    Here's a guy with a dream detail: guarding the beer supply. Lucky Lager was a San Francisco beer and Acme Ale was a Los Angeles brand (Wile E. Coyote, brewmaster in chief). Since they were both California beers I figure this photo was taken either in a base on the west coast or somewhere in the Pacific.

    Acme Ale Lucky Lager.gif
     
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  16. Black6

    Black6 Member

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    germans beer.jpg
     
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  17. Jba45ww2

    Jba45ww2 Well-Known Member

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  18. Jock Johnston

    Jock Johnston New Member

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    Hello...wondered if anyone could identify the beer (or maybe cider) in this photo...pretty sure its North Africa...could it be "home brew"...I think the guys are British RAF servicemen...Any help much appreciated
    J 20211022_093329.jpg
     
  19. harolds

    harolds Member

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    My father always said that his favorite posting in the USA was at/near St. Louis. The Anhauser-Busch Co. (Brewers of Budweiser) would let servicemen drink for free at the brewery.
     
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  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Lone Elk Park, just west of St. Louis on I-44, is famous for two things. It was an ammo proofing and storage ground during the war and I got married there. You can see testing ranges in Google Earth. They look like a three bar X, each "top end" fired across the range to the opposite "bottom end".

    I used to lead tours at the Endangered Wolf Center, now part of the Washington University Biological Reserve and Research Park. One time I took a tour past a pair of warehouses with train tracks adjacent. An older gentle sudden said loudly "I'll be damned!" He told us he used to ride a blacked-out train from St. Louis to the dump to handle the ammo. (There are dozens of storage bunkers there, basically concrete Quonset huts covered with earth.) He said he had never known where the facility was because the train took a very long path to avoid giving clues as to the distance from the train station downtown. Fifty-five years later he closed the loop. It was a cool connection for me.
     

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