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They Still keep Turning Up......

Discussion in 'WWII Today' started by Martin Bull, Feb 27, 2021.

  1. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Otto, TD-Tommy776 and Kai-Petri like this.
  2. Biak

    Biak Adjutant Patron  

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    I like the warning:

    "at some point today, all being well, there should be a big bang which will render this device safe".
     
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  3. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Wow!
    I prefer Tall Boy of all. What a bomb!

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Amazing how much ordnance is still turning up.
     
  5. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    I am not sure but in Europe there was no bomb clearing?? We Finns cleared the cities, countryside and the seas after WW2. Still we find bombs but we did clear the known areas.
     
  6. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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  7. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    So it was considered to be a luftwaffe bomb??
     
  8. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    No-one else has ever bombed Exeter........;)
     
  9. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    A few years ago I digitized a manual on US ordnance in WW2 that went to a French bomb disposal unit. Every year farmers find WWI bombs that have frozen out of the ground. As I understand it they put them beside the road and go about their planting.
     
  11. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "controlled"...as in "didn't actually take out half the county". :eek:
     
  12. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    1000 KG, apparently with 400 tons of dampening sand shovelled over as unstable fuse not workable.

    The thought occurs, again.
    "Why are you obsessed with WW2?"
    "Why aren't you?! It keeps turning up bleedin' everywhere"
     
  13. Terry D

    Terry D Well-Known Member

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    Just watching and hearing that damned thing go off gives me a better idea of what the war and the Blitz were really like than any number of books.
     
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  14. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    A very familiar sight in Northern France and Flanders after the ploughing seasons. The ones to watch out for are the gas shells.
     
  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I wasn't discriminatory. They made me stay a safe distance away when they blew them. And yes, the gas shells were treated with great respect.
     
  16. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    It's fairly unusual for unexploded ordnance to be exploded in situ these days. In both France and Belgium, the usual practice is for army trucks to 'do the rounds', collecting shells from beside the road. They're then destroyed at army camps ( such as the one at Elsenborn in the Ardennes ). This doesn't apply to aerial bombs and also some WW2 shells ( such as the PaK43 88m etc ) which have very sensitive fuses.
     
  17. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    My experience was in the mid-70s. They had an option then to blow them or take them away. I was under the impression that the roads were a factor in that decision. Heavy traffic or poor roads meant a in situ disposal.
     
  18. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Wouldn't the air delivered explosives tend to have a thin or more fragile container, making them more likely to be less stable if moved?
     
  19. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Most WWII aerial high-explosive bombs have cast steel casings and are quite robust to avoid potential breaking up when landing on concrete or paved areas, buildings etc. They're activtaed by fuse, not contact ( unlike many shells, for instance ). HC ( high-capacity) bombs such as the 4000lb 'Cookie' or the German parachute mine had very thin-skinned casings, relying purely on their surface blast effect. I'd guess that any of these surviving today would be severely corroded.

    The main problem with disposal of German WWII aerial bombs is the large number of different types of fuze used. Some were simple, others were designed to kill bomb disposal teams in 1940 - and can still do so today.
     
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  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The shells were evaluated in situ, of course. The farmers were very ballsy to even touch them. I saw one field that had over a dozen flags on it, that guy had been injured once too many times and didn't dick with them.
     

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