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They Still keep Turning Up......

Discussion in 'WWII Today' started by Martin Bull, Feb 27, 2021.

  1. Carronade

    Carronade Ace

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    Just a year or so ago a cookie turned up in the mud flats on the Rhine in IIRC Cologne, and a large area was evacuated while a team disarmed it. As Martin said, that type is mostly explosive, about 3000lb.
     
  2. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    When I was in grammar school in the early 1970s, someone brought in a cannon ball they had found on their land that apparently been left there in 1865 when Union soldiers passed through the area.

    The teacher put it on a shelf and we would handle it and occasionally drop it on the floor accidentally.

    After about a year or two, a Civil War reenactor came to the school for a demonstration and the teacher showed him the cannon ball. He about had a stroke, as it was an explosive type.

    The gymnasium was cleared and the explosive ordinance disposal group from Fort Rucker was called to deal with it.
     
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  3. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    The bomb:
    https://twitter.com/DC_Police/status/1365683677951381505?s=20

    EvPiEE-XEAAhYh0.jpg

    So... Hands up anyone that even fancies going near the fucker.
    Nope. Me neither.

    'The long walk' indeed.

    Something that's got me: There's even a reasonable chance that the chap who pulled the lever (pushed the button? No idea... ) to drop it may even still be with us.
    Think I'd find that sort of satisfying that the thing eventually went bang.

    Big style on TTH's comment.
    We have no idea, do we?
    Wiki paraphrasing:
    April '42 - two waves of forty bombers, mostly doing two sorties apiece. May - twenty more.
    Over a thousand personnel involved in damage control.
    30 Acres 'devastated'.
    156 killed, 583 injured.
    1,500 of the city's 20,000 houses obliterated. 2,700 badly damaged. 400 shops, 150 offices, 50 warehouses & (The horror!) 36 pubs destroyed.

    Some snaps of Exeter cathedral I took a couple of years back.
    remarkable work on rebuilding bomb damage. All those reassembly cracks a result of those Baedecker raids:

    IMG_20180723_161938525.jpg IMG_20180723_150940059.jpg IMG_20180723_151022872.jpg IMG_20180723_151032483.jpg IMG_20180723_150901890.jpg IMG_20180723_150805306.jpg

    There's also a beautiful medieval Wooden screen there that was painstakingly reconstructed after being turned to splinters, but it wasn't easy to photograph exactly what was done during restoration. Felt like 'Near-perfectly re-made' was the path taken.

    No wonder the Poles are held in such esteem there:

    IMG_20180723_150846904.jpg
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    So it was a mortar shell?
     
  5. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    So you clear the area or face these bombs all the while. Like said Finland clearead the bombs post-ww2.
     
  6. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    We still find more bombs as Darwin is developed...
    [​IMG]

    OK Who remembers this little gem of a tv show? Danger UXB (Unexploded bomb)
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  7. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Recently re-run on Talking Pictures tv (well, last year) in the UK. Finally managed to see the one episode I missed on it's first outing in '79.
    Great programme. First thing I noticed was the heavy background noise levels in outdoor scenes; even in the '70s, London traffic was abysmal.
     
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  8. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    This thread has given me an excuse to dig out some photos I haven't looked at for many years. In November 1986 I spent a week exporing the Somme. The amount of unexploded stuff was extraordinary and made you realise how intense those barrages of (then) seventy years earlier. I took a few pics along the way - tehse are from the Serre, Butte de Warlincourt and Thiepval areas. And no - I didn't fiddle around with them - although I still have a large chunk of German 15cm shell (with driving band ) which did come home with me.....

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    I have no idea. I was 9-10 years old and am parroting what we were told at the time.

    I know very little about 1860s ordinance in North America, so your guess is as good as mine.

    It was a rusty spherical iron object, about 5-6 in diameter found where a cavalry force of the Unites States Army was known to have passed through and camped in 1865.
     
  10. harolds

    harolds Member

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    On UXBs: The Germans dropped a lot of time fused bombs, meant to deter fire-fighters and rescue workers. These time fuses were of some sort of electrical type that were activated when they were released from the bomber. These fuses were in the side of the bomb instead of the nose or tail (see "Danger UXB!" ad above). I get the impression that many of these fuses didn't work and thus became problems when they were discovered-often well after the war.

    I've also read that RAF Bomber Command used the same tactic on German cities and I suspect the USAAF did as well.
     
  11. harolds

    harolds Member

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    If my memory serves me correctly, I saw the series in the early 1970s on the PBS which ran a lot of BBC content.
     
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  12. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    They clearly had first-class researchers, since all the uniforms (civilian and military) were pretty much spot on.
     
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  13. harolds

    harolds Member

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    They had better get the uniforms right! Most of the people who wore them in real life were still alive!
     
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  14. Terry D

    Terry D Well-Known Member

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    I remember that series. I only saw a little of it, but I liked what I saw. It certainly made your blood run cold thinking of what those sappers had to deal with.
     
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  15. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Given you were at the Somme...couldn't some of this be WW1?
     
  16. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Sorry, I should have been clearer...the Somme I visited was ALL WW1.....;)
     
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  17. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Which then raises an interesting question...was there any fighting in that area during WW2? Even pre or during Dunkirk?
     
  18. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    Yes there was - the famous incident where British 'Matilda' tanks momentarily halted Rommel's Panzers. But it was very much 'Blitzkrieg' and very few - if any - traces are left of the fighting.
     
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  19. Carronade

    Carronade Ace

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    Probably not. Civil War mortars were used almost entirely in sieges, ranging from the small Coehorn type to 13" monsters.

    A spherical explosive shell likely came from a 12pdr Napoleon smoothbore, one of the most common weapons on both sides. It would be about 4.67" in diameter.
     
  20. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    I remember seeing mortars mounted on flatbed cars at the front of trains during the ACW. Definitely mobile.
     

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