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What's Up With These Shermans?

Discussion in 'Weapons & Technology in WWII' started by scarface, Jan 5, 2008.

  1. Skipper

    Skipper Kommodore

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    Don't worry Scarface, noone will say that, actually your DD theat is quite interesting and I'm certain many learnt from it, including myself. Thanks for those who contributed too.
     
  2. Joe

    Joe Ace

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    The Russians also had amphibius tanks...

    T-37
    [​IMG]
    T-40
    [​IMG]

    And so did the Japanese...

    Type 3 Ka-Chi
    [​IMG]

    Type 5 To-Ku (Sorry, this was the only picture I could find)
    [​IMG]
     
  3. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    Some nice pictures of Bovington's DD, which uniquely (?) still has it's flotation screen here:
    D Day Tanks and countdown to 60th anniversary of D-Day from the Tank Museum Bovington

    And a very clear & concise explanation of Straussler's DD system:
    Tank Museum Bovington-straussler DD
    Including this excellent illustration of the drive, showing how an extra sprocket is fixed to the idler so it can be turned by the track and transmit power to the props:
    [​IMG]

    And some pictures of the first DD based on the Tetrarch (taken from 'tanks') along with more on it's development from the Tank museum: Bovington DD
    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    Straussler was indeed, a very clever man.

    Cheers,
    Adam.
     
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  4. Jim Baker

    Jim Baker Member

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    Good stuff guys, thanks!

    Adam,

    That diagram sure is easier to see and understand than to explain.

    Thanks again.
     
  5. Pieter

    Pieter recruit

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    I just joined your excelent forum. I have a question myself concerning the DD tanks during Operation Overlord. I have put it on my pages of the Shermantank and I sure would like that you guys had a look at it and have your own thoughts on the matter.
    The Sherman pages can be located here:
    SHERMAN

    and the question on the DD tanks here:
    http://www.strijdbewijs.nl/tanks/sherman/barbaraeng.htm

    Thanks,
    Pieter
     
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  6. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    Welcome Pieter, nice site, & a fascinating question, which I must confess has got me stumped... :confused:

    Cheers,
    Adam
     
  7. bodston

    bodston Member

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    Very well spotted Pieter. I have studied the British DD tanks in detail and these 'stacks' do not appear anywhere else. I can only assume that these were a local modification for the Sherman DD's that assaulted Omaha.
    They don't appear to be used on the Utah DD's either.

    It might be to do with the particular model of M4 that were used. The British and Canadians used 3 types of Sherman modified with the Canvas skirt on 6/6/44. The M4A1 (Sherman II), M4A2 (Sherman III) and the M4A5 (Sherman V). The cast hulled M4A1's were of the earlier 'small hatch' variety.

    The Americans used mainly the later 'large hatch' M4A1.

    The air intakes and exhaust systems were obviously different on each model because the three types used different engines. M4A1-Rotary, A2-Diesel, A4-Multibank

    It is possible that these exhaust chimney stacks were used due to particular problem of fume inhalation suffered by the 741st/743rd Battalions encountered while training. Most DD crews preferred to stay outside the tank during the run in, especially during training, the exception being the poor drivers. Commanders were provided with a platform with a compass in a binnacle and a tiller so that they could see over the screen and steer the vessel. But the co-driver, loader and gunner would generally be on the engine deck.

    Very interesting pictures, thanks for pointing them out.
     
  8. Jim Baker

    Jim Baker Member

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    Here is a US DD that made it to Germany before being destroyed.
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Klive

    Klive Member

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    Welcome to the forum, Pieter. Excellent stuff - I'm fascinated. Was it possible that the 741st fitted their Shermans for both roles (DD and wading) so as to switch them around as the situation required (last-minute breakdowns, etc)?

    Klive
     
  10. Jim Baker

    Jim Baker Member

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    Interesting. I just checked Hunnicutt's and didn't see anything. I wish that photo was a little clearer.
     
  11. Shockwavesoldier

    Shockwavesoldier Member

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    nice website, lots of info
     

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