Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

AK-47 in WW2?

Discussion in 'Russian Light Weapons' started by 10cents, Nov 17, 2007.

  1. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,358
    Likes Received:
    1,017
    Not neccesarily Takao...especially with a semi or full auto and a target rich environment of men charging...think trench warfare or large scale jungle warfare...easily finish the clip with targets still running at you...typically one would see the user swap the ends and start to club without sufficient time to reload or perhaps even get a side arm out...but with even a little bayonet...well...you're still in the fight and it might buy you time to reload...just my two cents.
     
  2. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,617
    Likes Received:
    1,658
    Location:
    God's Country
    There were instances in the Battle of Fallujah where certain US Marine units pushed forward (squad and platoon sized elements), found a well located building to secure and lager in, and waited for the supporting forces to fight forward with supply. The enemy would press them with heavy attacks from multiple directions while smaller elements would infiltrate around and behind attempting to delay the supporting elements and to prevent resupply. They'd then pull back but maintain contact, when US fire slackened they'd push forward again, but be ready to pull back if the return fire was heavy. Once they probed and didn't experience the increased volume of fire they'd start a deliberate attack with the intention of isolating and over-running the US position. In many cases re-supply fought it's way forward in armored vehicles, but sometimes they were stalled by heavy RPG fire from well located positions. On several occasions the platoons and squads had to fix bayonets, evacuate their position and fight their way back to the resupply points with a few grenades and cold steel, because their ammunition was exhausted.
     
  3. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2010
    Messages:
    6,358
    Likes Received:
    1,017
    Shit!
    Does not sound fun...
     
  4. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,617
    Likes Received:
    1,658
    Location:
    God's Country
    Not fun, but the aggressive use of the bayonet allowed them to extricate themselves, resupply with ammo and re-enter the fight.

    CAC, since you're interested in these things, here's some good footage of the Fallujah fight.



    Dude talking at the end was Captain Brian Chontosh he was awarded a Navy Cross during the 2003 Invasion, real bad ass.

    'They were probably the most horrific days of my life'

    Here's some more:



     
    CAC likes this.
  5. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,542
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Takao, my doughnut baking friend, surrendering is not an option. I'll go "Alamo" on them if and when the bullet launcher runs out of bullets. And if the big filet knife gets broke, I'll swing the rifle like Teddy Roosevelt's "Big Stick". Yep, that's the end plan.
     
  6. Takao

    Takao Ace

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2010
    Messages:
    8,564
    Likes Received:
    1,817
    Location:
    Reading, PA
    Haven't handled the m-4,, but I am thinking that an E-tool might be a better baseball bat. Thoughts?
     
  7. USMCPrice

    USMCPrice Idiot at Large

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    Messages:
    4,617
    Likes Received:
    1,658
    Location:
    God's Country
    [​IMG]

    Hand to hand still happens, that's why they stress MCMAP. Then there's the Marine (Corporal Clifford M. Wooldridge) that ended up going hand to hand with a Taliban fighter and beat him to death with his own machine gun.

    The story:

    "Navy Cross citation:


    The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Corporal Clifford M. Wooldridge, United States Marine Corps, for extraordinary heroism while serving as Vehicle Commander, Combined Anti-Armor Platoon White, Weapons Company, Third Battalion, Seventh Marines, Regimental Combat Team 2, First Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward) Afghanistan, on 18 June 2010 in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM.


    When their mounted patrol came under intense enemy fire, Corporal Wooldridge and his squad dismounted and maneuvered on the suspected enemy location. Spotting a group of fifteen enemy fighters preparing an ambush, Corporal Wooldridge led one of his fire teams across open ground to flank the enemy, killing or wounding at least eight and forcing the rest to scatter. As he held security alone to cover his fire team's withdrawal, he heard voices from behind an adjacent wall. Boldly rushing around the corner, he came face-to-face with two enemy fighters at close range, killing both of them with his M-249 Squad Automatic Weapon. As he crouched back behind the wall to reload, he saw the barrel of an enemy machine gun appear from around the wall. Without hesitation, he dropped his empty weapon and seized the machine gun barrel.
    He overwhelmed the enemy fighter in hand-to-hand combat, killing him with several blows to the head with the enemy's own machine gun. His audacious and fearless actions thwarted the enemy attack on his platoon. By his bold and decisive leadership, undaunted courage under fire, and total dedication to duty, Corporal Wooldridge reflected great credit upon himself and upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.


    Here's how his summary of action (a longer version of the story, used to approve the citation) recounts the struggle:


    Corporal Wooldridge then took cover back around the corner and quickly began to reload. While attempting to reload his weapon, he saw the barrel of a machine gun appear around the corner of the wall just a few feet from him. Without hesitation, he threw his empty SAW to the ground, and grabbed the barrel of the machine gun.

    Corporal Wooldridge then wrestled the surprised enemy fighter to the ground. As the two grappled for control of the machine gun, the enemy fighter released the machine gun and reached for one of his grenades in an attempt to kill himself and Corporal Wooldridge. Corporal Wooldridge immediately took control of the machine gun and beat the enemy fighter to death by hitting him with several blows to the head with his own weapon before the enemy could pull the pin on the grenade.


    Shortly after, the remaining members of his team came around the corner and witnessed the three dead enemy fighters and Corporal Wooldridge standing over one fighter holding the machine gun."

     
    lwd and Takao like this.
  8. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2008
    Messages:
    8,542
    Likes Received:
    1,417
    Location:
    Baton Rouge, Louisiana
    Funny you should mention that. When I was in the Army in Alaska in 1978, there was a guy in our company that was awarded the Silver Star in Vietnam for his efforts when the fire base he was posted at was in the process of almost being overrun. He expended all his ammunition, threw all his grenades, broke his rifle swinging it like a club, the went to town on the VC with his trusty e-tool. Mr. Charles and company were intent on cleaning out his position since he was being such a nuisance to their efforts. He was so meek and mild looking, definitely not the Rambo/John Wayne/Chuck Norris types. Just don't mess with his fighting position I guess.
     
    George Patton and lwd like this.

Share This Page