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For Those Interested in Archaeology

Discussion in 'Free Fire Zone' started by GRW, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Aye, I think there was an attempt at an American version, but don't remember it lasting long?
     
  2. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    The whole Brit version is on Youtube. Currently watching S14-E04 (Druid Last Stand).
     
  3. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    More Pictish stuff-
    "A 1,200-year-old standing stone discovered in the Highlands has carvings never before seen on a Pictish stone, archaeologists have said.
    The stone was found lying in the ground and covered by vegetation at an early Christian church site near Dingwall.
    Archaeologists have now revealed the side of the stone that was down in the earth and hidden from view was decorated with "two massive beasts".
    Just over a metre of the original two metre-tall (6ft) stone survives.
    The beasts were carved down the side of a cross.
    John Borland, of Historic Environment Scotland and president of the Pictish Arts Society, said: "The two massive beasts that flank and surmount the cross are quite unlike anything found on any other Pictish stone.
    "These two unique creatures serve to remind us that Pictish sculptors had a remarkable capacity for creativity and individuality.
    "Careful assessment of this remarkable monument will be able to tell us much about the production of Pictish sculpture that we could never have guessed at."
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-50040798
     
  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Currently watching Time Team on the Isle of Mull.
     
  5. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Where I want to retire...
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    It do look lovely, and rugged.
     
  7. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Used to have a mate at uni who had a holiday home in Tobermory. Never did manage to take him up on the offer of a weekend there.:(:oops:
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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  9. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Fascinating, but I'll give it a week before somebody contradicts it-
    "All modern humans may have descended from people in what is now Botswana, according to scientists.
    Researchers think they have, for the first time, discovered the 'cradle of humanity' where the first modern humans evolved before spreading across the globe.
    They are believed to have flourished in the prehistoric Makgadikgadi–Okavango wetland, just to the south of the Zambezi River.
    A study of DNA records and migration patterns has proven, scientists say, that the genetic root of all modern humans comes from that region 200,000 years ago.
    The wetland was a warm, lush green Garden of Eden in which early humans thrived before migrating when a wobble in the earth's axis 130,000 years ago caused the climate to turn dry.
    And direct descendants of these pioneers can still be found living in the arid Kalahari desert today."
    www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-7621887/Study-suggests-modern-humans-evolved-ancestors-Botswana.html
     
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  10. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    I would argue against the 200k years...that's already been challenged, and I would agree that 250-350k years would be closer and maybe further back still...But the wetlands rings true...we know chimpanzees walk upright through water (they cant swim) so an area/environment that would encourage an animal to walk on two legs regularly would have to be part of the puzzle.
     
    Last edited: Oct 29, 2019
  11. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Waiting for my relatives to start walking upright.
     
  12. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Yeah, it wasn't an invitation...:p:D;)
    You could well be right, they're only surmising. Great bit of work though.
     
  13. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Don't think there are any in Scotland. The Clava Cairns are something different.
    "A previously unknown Bronze Age monument has been discovered hidden in woodland in the Forest of Dean following an airborne laser scan.
    The ritual monument, known as a ring cairn, dates back to about 2,000 BC.
    It consists of a circular bank with several small limestone standing stones on top.
    Archaeologist Jon Hoyle, who found it, said it was the only site of its kind known about in Gloucestershire, and was a "very significant" discovery.
    It was identified following a LiDAR (light detection and ranging) survey of the Forest of Dean.
    The technique used laser beams fired from an aeroplane to create a 3D record of the land surface, effectively removing the trees from the landscape.
    Mr Hoyle said when he studied the data, he spotted an "extremely circular" feature, which he thought initially might be a World War Two gun emplacement.
    After visiting the site, at a secret location near the village of Tidenham, he realised it was much older, dating to between 2,500 BC and 1,500 BC.
    "It was very exciting. I was expecting to find quite a lot of new sites with the LiDAR, but nothing as interesting as this."
    The ring cairn is about 25m (80ft) in diameter and made up of a 5m-wide (16ft) rubble bank, with at least 10 white limestone standing stones, each no more than 1m (3ft) high, standing on top.
    Mr Hoyle said ring cairns were "common in upland areas, in places like Derbyshire, Northumberland and Wales" but this was the only known one in Gloucestershire."
    www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-50208092
     
  14. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Ive been interested in ancient building techniques for a couple of decades now...my goal to find or think of the easiest (to build) yet most effective forms of shelter. One often contradicts the other, especially when you want the structure to stand up to storms and heavy rain, be warm in heavy winter and strong enough to keep large animals and people out, at least long enough to escape or prepare for the confrontation.
    Ive come up with many different ideas, all having their own problems...a cave that is then excavated/dug out to create flat levels and rooms is usually where ive ended up (and there are many examples of this in the world) but I always get stuck when it comes to an effective "door" for these caves and a smoke escape...
    THIS is one of the best yet. Not even small and dingy but expansive...I like it a lot.
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2019
  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    You lot ever watch "Time Team"? (Available on Youtube.)
     
  16. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Yep. Tony Robinson had a guest spot on a sitcom called Plebs last night....as an archaeologist!
     
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  17. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Well, he did have a hell of a training course.
     
  18. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "THE architecture of an ancient settlement off the coast of Florida has been discovered by researchers in an unprecedented archaeological find.
    The discovery and the way in which it was found has excited researchers, as extremely advanced laser technology was able to penetrate through the surface of Florida's Gulf coast to discover an ancient settlement that predates colonial America. In the new paper, archaeologists from the University of Florida explained how they used drone-mounted lasers to gather an incredible amount of data in order to digitally map what was once a thriving community.
    Terry E Barbour, a doctoral candidate from the university and Professor Ken Sassaman, used aerial drones with light detection and ranging Lidar sensors.
    In doing this the researchers were able to create detailed 3D maps of the surface of Raleigh Island.
    Archaeological objects were first spotted on the island in 1990, though technology was not advanced enough to explore on the scale required."
    www.express.co.uk/news/world/1200085/ancient-history-latest-news-americas-florida-researchers-discovery-science
     
  19. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Ah, Floridaman couldn't figure out which side of the beach to build on?
     
  20. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Planning problems even then?
     

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