Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Ghost Soldiers

Discussion in 'The Pacific and CBI' started by Ron, Oct 18, 2001.

  1. Ron

    Ron Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2000
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    3
    I'm reading a book called Ghost Soldiers The Forgotten Epic Story of World War II's Most dramatic Mission by Hampton Sides.
    it is VERY well written and has your attention from the beginning...go to www.ww2n.com to get a quote of it. It looks long, but will probably have your attention pretty quickly. I highly recomend the book.
    basiclly the book is about a ranger battalion in the pacific and it's mission to rescue POWs from a camp in the Philippines. The sample that i quote sets the premice as to why this mission was important.
     
  2. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2000
    Messages:
    25,883
    Likes Received:
    855
    Sounds good to me. Ive seen it from time-to-time at Barnes and Nobles bookstore, but have never looked at it long enough to give it a chance. When I go there tonight, I will see if a copy is available to look at.
     
  3. Ron

    Ron Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2000
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hey if you ever do read it, let me know what you think!
     
  4. Mussolini

    Mussolini Gaming Guru WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2000
    Messages:
    5,734
    Likes Received:
    559
    Location:
    Festung Colorado
    Hello
    I recently acquired the book, Ghost Soldiers by Hampton Sides. It is very very interesting. In case you didnt know, it deals with the Bataan/Corregidor prisoners - most directly with those in the Cabautun (sp?) prison camp. Each chapted jumprs between life at the camp and the Rangers who have been sent to rescue them. The book keeps you attention through the stories of the survivors, describing their life at the hands of the Japanese, and the Rangers who face the problem of Japanese reinforcements - over 1000 japanese would be withing earshot of the gunshots once fired, and the marines only numbered around 121. Luckily, Captain Pajota and another Gorilla fighter have thei guerillas set ub roadblocks. Pajota and his 200 guerillas accounted for most of the 1000 dead japanese on the night, while suffereing no deaths and 20 casualties. Its is very remarkable...i hope i didnt ruin anything but there is much much more to the book.
     
  5. Ron

    Ron Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2000
    Messages:
    607
    Likes Received:
    3
    nope didn't ruin it for me...i'm reading it as we ...actually as i type.

    [ 23 October 2001: Message edited by: Ron ]
     
  6. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2000
    Messages:
    25,883
    Likes Received:
    855
    Sound good then, I will give it a try soon as I can get Barnes and Nobles to get it in. I checked a few days ago and they were out.

    Im always interested in the Cabanutuan POW camp--I actually met a Marine Sergeant that was imprisoned there, unfortunately, he passed away about 15 years ago. :(

    This Marine is in almost every way--just like my friend Remy Schrijnen--my favorite Knights Cross Recipient. [​IMG] Both men were extremely brave and VERY tough. Damn shame that the Sergeant, did not get the Medal of Honor :mad: he was the last man to either surrender or be captured on Bataan or Corrigador--I forget which :rolleyes: I think it was Bataan.

    [ 24 October 2001: Message edited by: C.Evans ]

    [ 24 October 2001: Message edited by: C.Evans ]
     
  7. Mussolini

    Mussolini Gaming Guru WW2|ORG Editor

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2000
    Messages:
    5,734
    Likes Received:
    559
    Location:
    Festung Colorado
    Do you recall this sergeants name? He might have been mentioned in the book at one point. Hampton Sides interviewd a lot of the men who survied the horrible ordeal....one man (the alst to be rescued) was partially deaf and blind due to lack of vitamins, and was taking a crap when the rescue started. He must have fallen asleep, because afterwards, he went abck to bed and woke up to find himself alone with a couple hundred dead Japanese. Some Guerillas found him and he made his way back. I think he was British too... ;)
     
  8. C.Evans

    C.Evans Expert

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2000
    Messages:
    25,883
    Likes Received:
    855
    Sorry it took me so long to get back to you.

    The mans name was MacCormack, or McCormack, I dont remember his first name. He was a Sergeant at that time--I think his actual rank was Gunnery Sergeant. He retired a Marine Sergent Major. Thats about all I really remember about him. :(
     

Share This Page