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Question about a fighter's roll and propeller (again)

Discussion in 'Aircraft' started by the_diego, Nov 17, 2019.

  1. the_diego

    the_diego Active Member

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    My memory's going faster than the veterans here (born 1963). I'm sure I posted these questions before and can't find the thread.

    1. Which type of roll actually shifts a single-engined fighter's forward axis to the side, a snap roll or a barrel roll?
    2. Which type of roll goes with and against the propeller's direction?
    3. Which type causes a plane to lose altitude (both?)
    4. What type of roll does a fighter do to shake off an enemy fighter that's right on his tail and starts firing?
     
  2. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    1. Canopy roll, which is a version of a displacement roll, which is a variant of a barrel roll.

    2. Either can be done against propeller direction, but a snap roll will be faster by rolling in the direction of prop rotation/engine torque.

    3. Either type of roll can be done to lose altitude.

    4. Either, snap roll into a dive or turn; barrel roll into a rolling scissors to try and force the attacker to overshoot.
     
  3. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Hmm...rolls don’t cause a loss of altitude per se...a turn does though. The extra g forces make the fighter heavier, too much for the available lift.
    And for 4. A “split arsed turn”...or in other words something not predictable.
     
  4. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    Not per se. However by banking to sharply in a turn, without increasing speed, you can enter into a banking turn stall/accelerated stall.
     
  5. harolds

    harolds Member

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    More: The steeper the turn the less up-lift the wings have. When flying straight and level about 100% of the lift forces are used to keep the plane at altitude. If the plane goes into a 45 deg. bank then half the lift forces are lifting the aircraft while half are pushing it to the side. That means the stall speed is increased because there is less lift. Increasing power helps as does pulling back on the stick while turning but almost always turning dogfights ended up considerably lower than where they started. If they started low then there's a danger of a controlled flight into terrain.
     
  6. CAC

    CAC Ace of Spades

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    Indeed gentlemen...a roll is something done quickly except in a deliberate sharp turn.
     

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