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The Book-buying Problem II

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by von Poop, Apr 16, 2019.

  1. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry Jeff, but now I'm struggling to follow what you mean? Your book is the same as my book, so I can see them very easily, unless you are talking about another edition of Reardon's Victory at Mortain of which I have been previously unaware? :p I don't think it could have piqued your interest 25 years ago, given it was published just 17 years ago. :DWhat exactly is the huge problem with the maps?

    Is it that they are black and white? Few publishers will expend the money on full-color illustrations, least of all on maps.

    Is it that they are sketches? Well, those on pages 22, 29, and 66 kind of need to be, since they are setting the geographic and operational scene...you can't get much detail on a 5" X 7" map that east-to-west covers Granville to Vire and north-to-south covers St Lo to Pontaubault.

    The map of Mortain on page 82 is quite detailed in regards to the area of the town, the topographical features, the forestation, and the unit locations. The map of the 30th ID dispositions on page 89 is less detailed, but still gives major topo features and the major units.

    And so on. All give the basic information, but the reality is on that scale, in a book reproduction of that size, what there is in this book is pretty good. Does it include all place names mentioned? No, an issue that bothered me too, but the thing is, it was likely impractical to do so. Add enough labels in maps that size and eventually it becomes all labels and no map...believe me, it's happened to me (I recall briefing the 106th ID dispositions to CAA WAAAY back in c. 1988 on a 30 by 40 inch mapsheet...the gentlest comment were words to the effect that "I can't actually see what you are pointing at since it all blends into a single blob of colors and labels. You need to simplify so your audience can actually see what you need them to see.")
     
  2. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Rich, I published a book in 2012 - Old Hickory Recon, Memories of the 30th Infantry Division, 1943-1945.
    It is the autobiography of a soldier in the 30th ID,, ghost written by me. See my signature below.

    The maps in it (my book) are inadequate and my comment above was directed at me. There are a total of two maps in the 300 page book and they look like a 3rd grader made them. I simply did not have the time nor skill to make them better.

    In followup, my book is part of the reason I didn't find Victory at Mortain as interesting to me now as it would have been years ago. I had read a great deal on Mortain already and reached saturation on the subject.
     
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  3. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish

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    Saturation is funny, isn't it.
    You get interested in something very specific, you devour everything you can for years, then quite often eventually have to genuinely struggle to plough through some new coverage as inevitably much of it is so familiar (despite the interest not really fading).

    Shame on me really as I know my weakness/ennui & a skim-reading habit often means I miss 'new' scholarship or nuggets of info. Part of the reason I still like forums & admire the true monomaniacs specialists that keep going full speed at subjects for ever.

    An HMSO on Coastal Command.
    1942.
    Local Tesco book heap.

    IMG_20190429_123242255-01.jpg
     
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  4. RichTO90

    RichTO90 Well-Known Member

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    To quote Homer Simpson, "Du-oh!" :D I suffered from target fixation and misread what you wrote obviously. :)
     
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  5. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    LOL, good show, Homer! I've done the same thing before, myself.

    Saturation. It is not just this subject, it most any book discussing the general history of any campaign or battle. I mostly prefer first hand accounts.

    I just finished
    [​IMG]

    It is the first book that I have read of the Japanese experience of the war. It was quite good.
    Originally written by Tameichi Hara in 1958, it was translated into English in 1961 and finally copyrighted and published in 1967. The book moves quickly and covers briefly his early life and acceptance into the Japanese Naval Academy at Eta Jima, the proceeds to the bulk of the content, which is WWII. He fought in several of the major battle, mostly in the Solomons Campaign. He was also instrumental in the development of Japanese torpedo doctrine.
    Throughout the book, Hara gave his opinions on most subjects in the Japanese Navy. I found it interesting that he did not like Adm. Yamamoto and most of the senior leadership. It was his opinion that Yamamoto would have been a better Minister of the Navy.
    I am glad I found this book and readily recommend it to the students of the PTO.

    10/10 Will read again.

    Now, I have moved on to:
    [​IMG]
     
  6. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    I read Japanese Destroyer Captain some time ago and really enjoyed it. If you like first person accounts especially at low levels I hardely recommend Quartered Safe Out Here. I've heard good things about The Emperor's Sea Eagle as well.
     
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  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Fahey's "Pacific War Diary" is great because I'm convinced he didn't write it to be published.
     
  8. MisterMongo

    MisterMongo New Member

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    I went through this e-book in one weekend. The guy was a good writer, and it was interesting to read about his training, combat experiences, and post-war occupation in the Philippines. It was on Amazon as a "People also bought" suggestion and had high rankings.

    [​IMG]
     
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