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USA/Canada provided asylum for war criminals

Discussion in 'Post War 1945-1955' started by YugoslavPartisan, Feb 14, 2017.

  1. YugoslavPartisan

    YugoslavPartisan Drug

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    Artuković's crimes were of political nature but Đujić was responsible for deaths of thousands of people, mostly civilians.
     
  2. lwd

    lwd Ace

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    There's also the issue of whether or not fraud or deception was involved in gaining said citizenship. There are usually questions in regards to whether crimes were committed asked during the process and if one lies about them citizenship may be revoked and or extradition granted without revocation of citizenship.
     
  3. TiredOldSoldier

    TiredOldSoldier Ace

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    Based on a single episode but it looks different here in Italy, a friend if mine was killed by a drunken US soldier a few years ago on a car accident and the he was quickly shipped out of country to avoid trial. Probably totally legal (nobody really knows what's in the NATO agreements about this sort of incidents, our spineless politicians probably didn't even read what they signed), but not friendly. That USN policy in Australia makes sense, rape is a highly emotional crime, do anything else and you might end up with being unable to send sailors on shore leave.

    I would agree that Yugoslavia being "communist" would have a role here, "one person's terrorist is another's freedom fighter" and that sort of stuff, Tito is considered a war criminal by a lot of Italians as there were quite a number of excesses by his troops.
     
  4. von Poop

    von Poop Waspish WW2|ORG Editor

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    Tito was in many ways a clever sod, who played a fine game with the USSR, but the truth is that The Cold War was a massive, fairly nasty, binary conflict, delicately balanced & exacerbated by buffer & satellite states, any of which could be a potential flashpoint.
    No way were the US, or most other 'Western' states, going to cave to many 'Red' requests, political, military, whatever, especially without exchange in kind. Not so many potential exchanges in some WW2 fascist's case.
    I don't think many cared that much for a long time, either. 'Nasty bastard? So what? Let's not stir things up, and look what those commie bastards did to the PoWs still coming out of the east just over ten years past the war, look at the bloodshed still going on'.

    Korea: 50-53
    Vietnam: Mid 50s-Mid 70s
    Afghanistan: Most of the 80s
    Proxy wars, Crises, Coups and shenanigans aplenty, all with that MAD thing hanging over the world.
    I'm only Mid-40s but still spent voluntary time in an ROC nuclear bunker in my youth, planning civil protection and threat plotting, with one ideological enemy in mind.... You can't underestimate the Cold War, as I don't doubt many people here remember far better than I do growing up at the arse end of it.
     
  5. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    The NATO SOFA(Status of Forces Agreement) is online for any that care to read it.
    http://www.nato.int/cps/en/natohq/57772.htm
    It is pretty much a boilerplate SOFA...

    Of course, similar, but, separate arrangements may be drawn up between countries on a case-by-case basis.
    https://www.state.gov/documents/organization/107265.pdf
     
  6. TiredOldSoldier

    TiredOldSoldier Ace

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    There is an apparent difference between what's written in the treaties and the day to day practice, whether that is covered by secret clauses or not is anybody's guess, the "stay behind" scandal seems to point in that direction.
    BTW the second document looks like a legal mess, usage of assets belonging to the "demanio militare", such as military installations, is outside the jurisdition of civilian courts, but as soon as servicemen leave those areas any agreement signed by two military commanders is not likely to stand in a civilian court.
     

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