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What Are You Reading?

Discussion in 'WWII Books & Publications' started by Mahross, Feb 1, 2004.

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  1. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Good show, glad you like it.

    I put my book I said I was reading above aside for Christmas, lack of time. Picked up a non-WWII and am reading it now. Will finish the Channel Island books in a few.
     
  2. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    I'm reading this now. I'm about halfway through and I agree. It's OK, but it doesn't really grab me. I usually like reading first hand accounts but the author introduces so many it's hard to keep track. I'll keep it, but it won't occupy a significant place in my library.
     
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  3. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Last night I finished
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    Outpost of Occupation, How the Channel Islands Survived Nazi Rule 1940-1945, Barry Turner, 2010, Aurum Press Ltd, 312pp, photos, endnotes, index

    I finished this last night, after starting it before Christmas. I had put the book down because of a lack of time during the holiday season and picked it back up this weekend past.

    Overall, I learned a great deal about the islands, specifically how they are governed and the association then and now with the United Kingdom. As a US citizen, I did not realize that the islands are a Crown possession and not necessarily subject to the same laws and other governances as British subjects in Old Blighty.

    The manuscript seems to have been well sourced utilizing a broad list of records and the author used direct quotes as often as he could. The writing style was engaging and held my interest well, in spite of me having to put it down for a few weeks because of time constraints.

    I did feel at times, though, the author went a bit beyond necessity as an apologist where collaboration was concerned, but this was not a constant, over-riding theme.

    The author noted the lack of significant resistance to the German occupation and I felt his reasoning held merit, which was the small size of the island and 3:1 to 1:1 ratio of occupiers to residents. The inhabitants had nowhere really to hide.

    This was a good read and I recommend it.

    9/10
     
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  4. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    I like the way Chris Goss writes books.

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  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Project Hail Mary, by Andy Weir, the author of The Martian.
     
  6. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Bruce Zorns' I Walk Through the Valley: A World War II Infantryman's Memoir of War, Imprisonment and Love
     
  7. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    What unit and theater?
     
  8. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    A really good read. I enjoyedcit and was actually sorry wghen I finished it.
     
  9. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    A Coy, 62nd Armored Infantry Batt, 14th Armored Div. It fought in the Vosges.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2022
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  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    First re-read here. Have you read Artemis?
     
  11. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Can´t help myself....

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    California Aero Press 1986, 256 pages, 25 photos.

    And yes, this might be interesting if I win it...

    Royal Australian Air Force over Europe

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    Eyre & Spottiswoode 1946, 244 pages, 54 photographs.... ;)
     
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  12. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Looks interesting, Kai
     
  13. LRusso216

    LRusso216 Graybeard Staff Member Patron  

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    No, I have not. Is it any good? Who is the author?
     
  14. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Naked Heart by Harold Pagliaro. A Troop, 121st Cavalry Squadrong, 106 Cavalry Group. They were the "gap holder" between Patton's Third and Patch's Seventh Army.
     
  15. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    It's Andy Weir's second book. Takes place on the Moon.
     
  16. Kai-Petri

    Kai-Petri Kenraali

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    Got a bit greedy. Well, luckily these are ca 200-pages books so should not take forever to read one at a time.

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    Leo Cooper 1983, 184 pages, 3 maps.
     
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  17. Riter

    Riter Active Member

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    Sy Kahn's Between Tedium and Terror. Kahn served in the Philippines.

    BTW KP- I never heard of that book. I'll have to check it out.
     
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  18. GeoPM

    GeoPM New Member

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    Just finished H.P. Wilmott’s The Barrier and the Javelin
    Not an easy read but very detailed.

    next up: John Lundstrom’s Black Shoe Carrier Admiral
     

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    Last edited: Jan 25, 2022
  19. Half Track

    Half Track Well-Known Member

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  20. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    Last night I finished
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    Agent For The Resistance, Herman Bodson, 1994, Texas A&M University Press, 243 pages, photos and maps. ISBN 0-89096-607-9

    This is an autobiographical work of a member of the Belgian underground, active around Brussels and the Ardennes. The story starts in the early 1930s as the author introduces friends who will figure later in the story and he outlines doctorial work in chemistry. During the Belgium build up to war, he was drafted and trained as a medic, where he was when the war started.
    His early work in the resistance centered mostly on activities associated with his profession, until he was suspected in an operation and fled to the Ardennes and assumed an new name. In the Ardennes, he led a group that conducted demolition missions and successfully destroyed a bridge under a 600+ man troop train in early June 1944.
    After the liberation of eastern Belgium and his group, Service Hotton, was stood down, he went to work for SHAEF, pursuing agents and collaborators who remained in Belgium. He was in Bastogne on Dec 16 and due to the fluid situation at the time, he stayed on during the siege and provided medical assistance to US troops and civilians. He left not long after the siege was lifted.

    The book was a bit slow at the start, but secured my interested quickly after that. The manuscript was well written, with good details and liberal use of names of his compatriots. Bodson provides good descriptions of actions and results and while he did occasionally drift into editorializing, it was by no means obtrusive and did not detract over-all from the excellence of the book.

    Dr. Bodson eventually moved to and retired in the United States and I suspect the book may not be available in Belgium and is only available in English.

    9/10 An engaging story.
     

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