Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Death Toll at Stalingrad?

Discussion in 'Eastern Europe October 1939 to February 1943' started by Not One Step Back, Feb 9, 2010.

  1. Not One Step Back

    Not One Step Back Member

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    7
    okay, just wondering wat you guys think about the death toll at Stalingrad. some sources seem to say as low as 750, 000, but some even go as high as 2 million (which even by the bloody standards of the eastern theatre seem a bit too high)

    i'd always thought 500, 000 soviet dead, 147, 000 German dead (with 90, 000 prisoners taken.)
    the biggest problem seems to be civilians! most agree that 40, 000 died in the first week of bombing but no one seems to know how many remained in the city and how many were evacuated etc.
    also if someone has figures on the losses of the romanian 3rd and 4th armies and the italian 8th army, that would be helpful
    cheers!
     
    george marshall likes this.
  2. george marshall

    george marshall Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    5
    Hmm ; A Good / Valid Post , Will send you some Information Tomorrow.

    Regards ; Big George.
     
  3. george marshall

    george marshall Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    5
    Dear Member ;

    Excellent New Posting ...:D
     
  4. Sloniksp

    Sloniksp Ставка

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    Messages:
    6,321
    Likes Received:
    459
    The 6th army consisted of about 360,000, so the 147k casualties might be a bit low.
     
  5. LJAd

    LJAd Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2009
    Messages:
    4,997
    Likes Received:
    236
    Il depends if one is talking of the period before or after the encirclment .
    For the period after the encirclment ,I have the following from AHF (casualties at Stalingrad )
    23-11-1942 till 12-01-1943:
    KIA 6870
    WIA 21011(these became MIA at the capitulation )
    MIA 3143
    In these figures are excluded 23000 men saved out of the cauldron .
    After 12-01-1943 :178505 MIA (of whom 1O1000 were becoming POW second the Russians ).
    I don't know if the 21011 WIA are included in the MIA after 12-01-1943,but probably yes .
    Thus the number at Stalingrad on 22-11-1942 would be some 225000.
    I don't think that there are reliable figures for the period before 22-11,but the losses must have been heavy .
     
  6. Oklop

    Oklop recruit

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Was there not also a Hungarian army that got hit very bad during the Soviet counterattack?
     
  7. sniper1946

    sniper1946 Expert

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Messages:
    12,560
    Likes Received:
    1,017
  8. Kruska

    Kruska Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2008
    Messages:
    1,866
    Likes Received:
    190
    Hello Slon,

    not really, if you take into account that from the 90,000 German prisoners only 5000 made it back after the war.
    (From the 22 generals - 19 made it back) - seems the Soviets had a liking for German generals.
    From German records the usually mentioned casualty figure is at around 250,000. Which if you take the 147' plus the 85' adds up to just about that figure.
    Furthermore please keep in mind that the Germans divided the loss statistic of Stalingrad between the initial advance towards and into Stalingrad and after being cut off.
    The figure 147,000 + 85,000 therefore displays only the losses within the pocket.
    Losses (killed and wounded) defined at taking Stalingrad are placed at around 45,000.

    Regards
    Kruska
     
  9. Totenkopf

    Totenkopf אוּרִיאֵל

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2007
    Messages:
    1,460
    Likes Received:
    89
    Not to mention thousands of replacments....
     
  10. Sloniksp

    Sloniksp Ставка

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2006
    Messages:
    6,321
    Likes Received:
    459
    Yes, you are correct Kruska. The point I was trying to make is that if out of 360,000 men at the beginning of battle, only 90,000 remained (to be taken prisoner) higher casualties must have existed. I am of course speaking overall figures (no break downs of places, times, reasons, etc.) Am I mistaking?
     

Share This Page