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U.S. Army Field Manuals--World War II

Discussion in 'Military Training, Doctrine, and Planning' started by Spaniard, Mar 19, 2010.

  1. jason4473

    jason4473 Member

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    Thank you Greg! at least half of my u.s stuff is from her family, both of her gandfathers and two great uncles were in ww2 sadly I never got to meet them!
     
  2. Scarred1

    Scarred1 Member

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    Greg,

    I completely agree with the value of the FMs. It is interesting to think of the 1,000s of Lieutenants and Captains learning their trade with these manuals. The best of course improvised on the spot but they all had these tactical basics to build upon. I think the evolution of US tactics and doctrine during the war are a great example of a "learning organization" at work - throwing out the bad ideas and standardizing on best practices. Few would say the US military was prepared for modern war in 1941 but its doctrine adapted quickly. Brings a tear to my eye.....
     
  3. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    We don't have any of those. I'd love to put them online.
     
  4. Spaniard

    Spaniard New Member

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    Mr Jason, Thank you for your Contribution to the Thread. The Pictures of the Manuals you posted are quite interesting.
     
  5. jason4473

    jason4473 Member

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    Spaniard and OpanaPointer thank you! OpanaPointer is going to scan them and put them online for research!
     
  6. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Glad to help! We had two of the manuals already, but the quality is very low on them, so this is an upgrade as well as an addition. :cool:
     
  7. Greg Canellis

    Greg Canellis Member

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    Yes, I agree. My father passed away when I was quite young. As the years went by, I learned he was a reconaissance sergeant in a battalion heavy weapons company (and a darn good one too according to several men who knew him, I am proud to say). I learned much of his duties from FM 7-15 Heavy Weapons Company, Rifle Regiment May 19, 1942. This FM made many of the tid-bits I had heard over the years come together nicely for me.

    Another thing I would like to point out: There is a generalization that during the Standardized Testing process, the cream of the crop recuits were skimmed off for more technical skills such as pilot training etc, while the less intelligent recuits went to the infantry. There may be SOME truth to this, however, anyone who has read a WWII infantry FM, or TM, will note that the infantryman's trade was quite complicated at times. Try reading the FM on map reading, as only one example.

    Greg C.
     
  8. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Very much a myth. You don't put guns into the hands of a bunch of morons. Well, unless you give them turbans too. :D
     
  9. Greg Canellis

    Greg Canellis Member

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    Oh I agree! But even the West Point system in history that the smart graduates were commissioned into the Engineers, then Artillery, Cavalry, and then the rest ... well, they went into the infantry. I always admire "The Queen of Battle."

    Greg C.
     
  10. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    It was actually aptitude tests, not intelligence tests, that decided where you were going.
     
  11. Greg Canellis

    Greg Canellis Member

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    But in the West Point example, wasn't it mostly the highest class rating were commissioned in the Engineers etc, while the lowest class standings went to the infantry?

    Greg C.
     
  12. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    For W.P. yes, but you have to remember that this system was started when firing a muzzle loading cannon was a technical trade, and building a bridge that wouldn't fall down was pure wizardry.
     
  13. Greg Canellis

    Greg Canellis Member

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    LOL gotcha. I watched a video at Gettysburg once on all the steps of firing a 12-pounder Napoleon cannon. I thought, wholly crap...I didn't realize there was so much involved! Guess it would have been the infantry for me!

    Greg C.
     
  14. USS Tennesee

    USS Tennesee recruit

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    Are there any Naval Manuals online from that era? That would be interesting reading.
     
  15. Takao

    Takao Ace

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  16. USS Tennesee

    USS Tennesee recruit

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    Wow those a great links! Thank you.
     
  17. Slipdigit

    Slipdigit Good Ol' Boy Staff Member WW2|ORG Editor

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    A note to you new guys. A regular contributor (and I think owner) of Hyperwar is our fellow Rogue, OpanaPointer, who in real life is known as Larry Jewell.

    They are needing transcription assistance, if anyone has the free time.
     
  18. cobblejohn

    cobblejohn Member

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    Thanks for the link I found some cavalry manuals I have been looking for!!!!
     
  19. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    We mostly need people to read books and fix any xlation errors between the hardcopy and the HTML version. We supply the file and a PDF of the book, you read the HTML and correct the odd error. Self-paced, we stress accuracy over speed.
     
  20. T. A. Gardner

    T. A. Gardner Genuine Chief

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    Just got a new US Army one today at a yard sale: Tactics and Technique of Infantry: Basic published in May 1942. Very detailed manual for training US infantry.
     

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