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Why did Germany stop the Blitz on Britain?

Discussion in 'Air War in Western Europe 1939 - 1945' started by Poppy, Sep 19, 2010.

  1. JBark

    JBark Member

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    Britain probably had been the only country to really develope their air force appropriately.


     
  2. Martin Bull

    Martin Bull Acting Wg. Cdr

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    At risk of being super-pedantic :eek: the Stirling narrowly beat the Halifax into Operational service ( February '41 as against March '41...)

    Just to confuse the issue, the Halifax was actually added to Squadron strength slightly earlier.....;)
     
  3. macrusk

    macrusk Proud Daughter of a Canadian WWII Veteran

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    Sorry for being off topic, but wanted to clarify the statement that Northern Ireland was unbombed. One of my acquaintances at the genealogy branch spoke on the occasion of Remembrance Day about his experiences as a child in Belfast when they were bombed. For other information on this, please see:

    Northern Ireland History - World War Two

    "Belfast Blitz

    On the 7th, 8th, 15th and 16th April and again on the 4th, 5th and 6th of May 1941, Belfast was bombed for ten hours by the German Luftwaffe, killing 1,100 people, wrecking close to 60,000 homes and leaving 100,000 people homeless."
     
  4. phylo_roadking

    phylo_roadking Member

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    Development of the Stirling and Manchester continued after Munich, but was sloooow - the Stirling first flew in 1939, but wasn't used operationally until 1941. The Manchester arrived earlier - but only because the Air Ministry ordered "off the drawing board" BEFORE the Moritorium...and we all know what sort of a pig's abortion THAT resulted in! :eek: The HP Halifax was the same - ordered "off the drawing board" in 1937, and it too came with problems, but thankfully nothing quite so terminal as the Manchester!
     
  5. JBark

    JBark Member

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    ?Sorry?

    The United States, the USSR and Great Britain developed four engine bombers through the 1930's. Whether the development of the British planes was slow or not they were operational within the second year of the war. The Germans suffered from never getting the Luftwaffe out from under the thumb of the Heer and it remained a tactical air force through the war. The RAF was ahead of the Luftwaffe in many respects and this was one. I'm not sure what point you are trying to make.
     
  6. JBark

    JBark Member

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