Welcome to the WWII Forums! Log in or Sign up to interact with the community.

Surrender of U 570

Discussion in 'Submarines and ASW Technology' started by Liberator, Oct 2, 2007.

  1. Liberator

    Liberator Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,202
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    UK
    The following is taken from the document AIR 41/47.

    August 1941 ended with a episode unique in air operations - the surrender of a U-boat to an aircraft.

    Hudson "S" of No.269 Squadron (Pilot S/L. Thompson. Navigator F/O. Coleman) based in Iceland while on an A/U sweep on 27 August sighted a U-boat at 1050 hrs at a distance of 1200 yards apparently just having surfaced (About 80 miles south of Iceland) The aircraft immediately attacked and from an altitude of 100 feet released 4 - 250lb Amatol filled depth charges set to detonate at 50 feet depth. The stick straddled the U-boat while in the act of diving. When the explosion plumes of water and spray had subsided the U-boat was seen to have resurfaced in a bows down condition and 10 - 12 men were gathered on the conning tower and round the gun. The aircraft attacked with machine-gun fire whereupon a piece of white material was waved from the bridge. Shortly afterwards more of the crew crowded on to the bridge displaying a large white painted board.

    The aircraft informed base of the situation and kept patrolling close round and over the U-boat until relieved at 1345 hrs by Catalina "J" 0f No.209 Squadron. Signals had been sent to the nearest A/S trawlers on patrol to close the position but if none had arrived on the scene by nightfall the aircraft was instructed to sink the U-boat after giving due warning. However, at 2250 hrs the first A/U trawler arrived but the heavy seas prevented a boarding party being sent. The U-boat was ordered to show a white light and close watch was maintained throughout the night. By 0830 hrs on the 28th, six more trawlers had arrived but the state of the sea still frustrated all attempts at boarding or passing a tow and the U-boat was definitely settling by the head. Orders to the U-boat's crew to blow more ballast and oil fuel to regain trim were disregarded until encouraged by a burst on M/G fire.
    At 1530 hrs. U 570 was boarded with the aid of a Carley float, the wounded were transshipped and at 1600 hrs the U-boat was in tow Stern first.

    She was finally beached at Thorlakshafn near Reykjavik.
     
    TA152 likes this.
  2. TA152

    TA152 Ace

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2002
    Messages:
    3,423
    Likes Received:
    120
    That was pretty interesting ! I had not heard that a Hudson captured a sub before but I have read of a Short Suderland capturing a sub at a later date.

    Thank you for posting this.
     
  3. Jan7

    Jan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    55
    Liberator: What an amazing discovery! Do you read this document directly or in a reference in a book? I know that exist one book, not say at all you the tittle with this matters.


    Dear friends of WWIIF:

    If you guest learn more about the U-570, you can visit:
    U-Historia, Ubootwaffe 1939-1945 --> Historia --> Historial UBoots --> U570 Translate by the translator of my signature, for example.
    U-boat Archive - U-570
    U570
     
  4. fer-de-lance

    fer-de-lance Member

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2007
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    2
    HM Submarine Seal the only Royal Navy submarine captured at sea, also surrendered to aircraft, an Arado 196 floatplane which landed alongside. HM Submarine Seal had been damaged by a German mine and stuck on the bottom at Kattegat for more than 22 hours. After two desperate attempts, the Seal finally managed to struggle to the surface with most of her crew suffering from the effects of foul air after such a long period submerged.

    The Seal tried to make for Sweden but was hampered by her damaged stern and only one diesel left operable. Attacked by German aircraft (one He-115 and two Arado 196) and in danger of sinking, the C.O. Lt Lonsdale chose to surrender to save his exhuasted crew. Code books and other sensitive materials had been dumped over the side earlier in weighted bags. The secret Asdic equipment was also destroyed before the boat was surrendered.

    An Arado 196 floatplane landed alongside to accept the surrender. Lonsdale swam over to the plane as a "hostage" until the German antisubmarine trawler UJ-128 arrived. The Seal was eventually towed to a Danish port and salvaged, even though Lonsdale and even the German officer initially inspecting her had believed that the Seal was sinking and would never make port.

    Lonsdale and the XO were honorably acquitted at a postwar Court Martial. Interestingly, the mines laid by HM Submarine Seal on this mission sank four ships over the course of a month following her capture.
     
  5. TA152

    TA152 Ace

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2002
    Messages:
    3,423
    Likes Received:
    120
    Anouther great story ! Any of you know of aircraft surrendering to subs or ships ?
     
  6. Liberator

    Liberator Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,202
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    UK
    The document AIR41/47 is not published in a book but can be obtained from the National Archives at Kew. It's full title is....

    RAF Narrative
    The RAF In The Maritime War
    Volume III
    The Atlantic And Home Waters - The Preparative Phase
    July 1941 To February 1943.

    I obtained a copy of the above a number of years ago to assist in my research into a particular Coastal Command squadron.
     
  7. Jan7

    Jan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    55
    The History of the HMS Seal

    U-Historia, Ubootwaffe 1939-1945 --> Historia --> Articulos Historicos -->
    Sumergibles de otras marinas en la Kriegsmarine --> UB (ex Seal)

    U-Historia, Ubootwaffe 1939-1945 --> Historia --> Historial UBoots --> Fichas e historiales de los sumergibles de otras marinas en la Kriegsmarine --> UB

    uboat.net - Index of U-boats - Foreign U-boats - UB (ex HMS Seal)


    And finally a Youtube:
    [​IMG]
    Captured British Submarine is Converted to a U-boat (1940)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2sckyKwbgME
     
  8. Jan7

    Jan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    55
    Many thanks for the information. [​IMG];)

    I am investigating with a friend the history of the U-617, after 12/Sep/1943 -sank near Melilla-.
    I post My links about RAF in WWII. I hope are in your interest. Also use this book: Amazon.co.uk: RAF Coastal Command in Action, 1939-45: Archive Photographs from the Public Record Office: Books: Roy Conyers Nesbit for his photos and very valuable information.
     
  9. Liberator

    Liberator Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,202
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    UK
    Hi Jan7,

    No doubt you have the following info which comes from the book "Britain's Sea War" by John M.Young.

    22 September 1942.
    South-east of Cape Farewell, U 617 attacked a homeward bound convoy, sinking the cargo ship 'Tennessee' 2,342 t and the tanker 'Athelsultan'

    28 December 1942.
    The naval tug 'St.Issey' was sunk by U 617 off Benghazi.

    1 February 1943.
    The minelayer 'Welshman' was sunk by U 617 while on passage from Malta to Alexandria.

    6 September 1943.
    East of Gibraltar, the destroyer 'Puckeridge was sunk by U 617.

    12 September 1943.
    Off Melilla the corvette 'Hyacinth' the Trawler 'Haarlem' and the sloop 'Wollongong' and aircraft sank U 617.
     
  10. Jan7

    Jan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    55
    Liberator: Of your interest:

    centroeu.com/bombing/bombardeos.xls [Microsoft Excel]
    233. 2195. 0.00. 0.00. 615. 9/1/39 ... 31 Wellingtons de 109 Squadron hacen x primera vez de PFF pero sin radar, sólo ... Fuerza disponible BC RAF. 1000 ...
    more hits from: http://centroeu.com/bombing/bombardeos.xls - 109 KB
     
  11. Liberator

    Liberator Ace

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2006
    Messages:
    1,202
    Likes Received:
    75
    Location:
    UK
    What follows is an account of the loss of U 617 taken from "U-boat versus Aircraft" by Norman Franks and Eric Zimmerman.

    On 11/12 September 1943 Wellington aircraft were in action against U 617 (Kapitanleutnant Albrecht Brandi) The U-boat had been located and attacked initially by Wellington 'P' of 179 Squadron at 0050 hrs off the northern Moroccan shore, heavy flak being met as soon and the Leigh Light went on. Squadron Leader D B. Hodgkinson RCAF straddled the boat with his depth charges and the boat began to leave a trail of oil. Keeping the boat under observation they homed in Wellington 'J' of the same Squadron.
    It appeared as if the submarine was trying to make neutral waters, the boat clearly seen by 'J''s crew on a calm sea under a cloudless sky. The radar picked her up then the oil trail could be clearly seen in the moonpath. 'J' attacked up the moonbeam in position 3517/0302, the boat opening up with heavy flak almost as the Leigh Light came on, and the aircraft was hit in several places, the rear gunner being fatally wounded.
    The front gunner had tried to keep the u-boats gunners heads down, hits being seen to splatter around the conning tower, then the depth charges were going down from 80 feet. Knowing his aircraft had been hit around the port side, the pilot kept on going and stated to climb to 500 feet, but upon inspection the damage was not too server so he turned back to the results of his attack.
    About a minute later flames could be viewed comming from the conning tower for almost a minute and the boat could be seen down by the stern. The aircraft continued to shadow the boat for 45 minutes until it finally beached herself on the Moroccan coast in position 3513/0329. Next morning U 617 was lying on her port side with the conning tower awash; her crew were ashore, drying their clothes. She was finished off by attacks from Hudsons, Swordfish and finally gunfire from HM ships. The German crew suffered no casualties and all 49 men survived. Interned by the Spanish, they were later repatriated to Germany.

    Wellington J/179 Squadrons wounded rear gunner made no mention of being hit, but as the captain finally turned for home, there was no reply from an R/T check, so one of the crew went to investigate. He had remained at his post and bled to death.

    Crew of Wellington J/179

    P/O. W H. Brunini. Pilot
    Sgt. A. Jones. 2nd pilot.
    F/O. V H. Johnson. Navigator.
    Sgt. F M. Crowdis. Wop/Ag.
    F/S. H W. Barnfield. Wop/Ag.
    F/S. W. Jones RAAF. Died of wounds.
     
  12. Jan7

    Jan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    55
    Dear Liberator: :eek:
    Its the cronic of the attack! Many thanks for your transcription!

    I Incorpored this at our job.....

    The history of the Crew, and the fugue of the Captain Brandi its the theme of the work.

    My Friend Emilio spent seven years in the investigation.

    In the book before cited are photos of this incident.


    Particularly, I talk about the following ones:

    • Page 90 Ref Air 15/470 Aerodrome of Gibraltar in North Front.
    • Page 96 Ref AIR 65/94 Leigh Light mounted in an Halifax airplane.
    • Page 116 Ref AIR 27/472 Attacks to U-617 in 12/Sept/1943.
    • Page 117 Ref AIR 15/471 U-617 left and beached.
     
  13. Uncle Jack's Niece

    Uncle Jack's Niece recruit

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    I thought I may have written this on here before but obviously not. F/C Coleman (later W/C) was my great uncle "Jack". I always knew that this had happened but when I was little I didn't realise how important it had been. Uncle Jack had an office in his house with scrap books of photos of the germans surrendering as they walked off the submarine which always fascinated me. I think his uniform and scrapbooks were donated to Halton (am not sure it was definitely Halton) but I don't know if they have ever been displayed. His uniform also used to be aon a mannequin in his office.
     
  14. Jan7

    Jan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    55
    Welcome to WW2F;)!

    If you wish share the photos:rolleyes:, don't hesitate in post these treasures....!




    Jan.
     
  15. Uncle Jack's Niece

    Uncle Jack's Niece recruit

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks, unfortunately i don't have the photos as I think they were donated. I did find one on the internet though and if I find any I will post them.
     
  16. pelerin

    pelerin recruit

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Delighted to read the post from 'Uncle Jack's niece'. We must be related as he was my cousin! Although we were first cousins his daughter is actually far nearer in age to me that Jack was. Should be interested to know which cousin you are the daughter of?
     
  17. pelerin

    pelerin recruit

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2009
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Rereading 'Uncle Jack's niece' I see you are his great niece so your grandmother must have been either 'Pom' or Mary. Your great aunt Janet made out a detailed family tree on her side some years ago when she visited us so am hving fun trying to guess where you appear.
     
  18. Centurion-Cato

    Centurion-Cato Member

    Joined:
    Sep 24, 2009
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    1
    Creepily, I was just reading a book (The Admirals Wolfpack) that mentioned the surrender of U-570.
    I find it amazing that they surrendered to a plane, it is just not the kind of thing you expect to happen in that kind of situation. But I suppose it can be justified in the fact that the crew of U-570 were only 2 months into their training, and not the normal 5 months.
     
  19. Jan7

    Jan7 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    55
  20. Tim Cowen

    Tim Cowen recruit

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Just discovered the above concerning U570. My Great Uncle was Flt Lt Edward Arthur Jewiss DFC. He was the pilot of the Catalina from 209 Squadron that took over the guarding of U570 from the Hudson. He flew over the craft throughout the night in appalling conditions until assistance could arrive. A few days earlier he had sunk U452. He was awarded the DFC for his part in these actions. He and most of his crew were killed whilst taking off for a Biscay patrol on the morning of 14th December 1941 at Pembroke Dock. He had been a career serviceman, having joined the RAF in 1919. I grew up with the stories of his career from his widow, my Great Aunt, who would proudly show me the DFC which she collected from the King after her husband was killed. I now own the DFC and other medals along with various photographs and documents, including some original photographs of U570 being captured which are marked 'Secret' on the reverse in red pencil.
     

Share This Page