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U.S. Civil War History bits

Discussion in 'Military History' started by C.Evans, Jan 19, 2011.

  1. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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  2. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    That’s a good series. All of Ken Burns work is top notch. His series on the Roosevelt’s was extremely interesting.
     
  3. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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  4. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    That one's still on Netflix as well.
     
  5. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    Whole brigades of Irishmen.
     
  6. Takao

    Takao Ace

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    GRW and A-58 like this.
  7. OpanaPointer

    OpanaPointer I Point at Opana Staff Member Patron   WW2|ORG Editor

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    "...conjoined the same Virginia cavalry battalion." :p
     
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  8. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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  9. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    BLACK-EYED PEAS AND THE CIVIL WAR

    Do you eat black-eyed peas for good luck on New Year's Day? This tradition may have some beginnings from the Civil War.

    Some suggest the tradition dates back to the Civil War, when Union troops, especially in areas targeted by General William Tecumseh Sherman, typically stripped the countryside of all stored food, crops, and livestock, and destroyed whatever they could not carry away. At that time, Northerners considered "field peas" and field corn suitable only for animal fodder, and did not steal or destroy these humble foods.

    In the Southern United States, the peas are typically cooked with a pork product for flavoring (such as bacon, ham bones, fatback, or hog jowl), diced onion, and served with a hot chili sauce or a pepper-flavored vinegar.

    The traditional meal also includes collard, turnip, or mustard greens, and ham. The peas, since they swell when cooked, symbolize prosperity; the greens symbolize money; the pork, because pigs root forward when foraging, represents positive motion. Cornbread also often accompanies this meal.

    We always have rice and gravy as well. Pretty good eatin', regardless of it's origins.
     
  10. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    Don't think this has been posted before-
    "For four breathlessly hot days in mid-July 1863, New York City became the northernmost battleground of the Civil War. Mobs marauded through Manhattan, looting and burning homes and public buildings, fighting police and soldiers, and beating and sometimes killing those who resisted. African Americans were singled out as particular targets. Never before or since had the public order of a major American city been so imperiled. Democracy lay bleeding in the streets.
    The spark that ignited the rioting was the 1863 Conscription Act, but a combustible mixture of long-festering issues—slavery, abolitionism, social class, politics, ethnicity, race, labor, and capital—fueled the fire that threatened to consume the Union’s largest and most important city. In 1860, New York City was home to 805,658 souls, 53 percent of whom were native born. Of the nearly 400,000 people who had come from abroad, 53 percent were Irish. By the war’s outbreak, some 86 percent of the city’s laborers and 74 percent of its domestic servants hailed from Ireland. More than half the city’s blacksmiths, weavers, masons, bricklayers, plasterers, stonecutters, and polishers were also Irish-born. By comparison, New York’s free black community was miniscule. Numbering 12,000 men, women, and children, blacks represented less than two percent of the city’s population.
    In 1860, 58 percent of the population lived in 15 downtown wards that covered less than nine percent of Manhattan’s area. The slums in the 6th, 11th, 13th, and 14th wards on the Lower East Side housed 147,264 residents. Irish, German, and Jewish immigrants lived cheek by jowl with free blacks. They labored at the same menial jobs, drank at the same taverns, and mingled in the same streets and dance halls. Living in such close quarters bred resentment and hostility that could easily erupt in violence. Between 1834 and 1863, there were at least a dozen major civil disturbances, several of which featured Irish New Yorkers as protagonists and African Americans as victims.
    The Conscription Act that would trigger the rioting in July 1863 was an act born of necessity. With 130 regiments scheduled to leave for home in May and June, the Union Army needed 300,000 new recruits, and leaders in Washington were worried that few of the initially optimistic volunteers would reenlist. The new bill called for all male citizens between the ages of 20 and 45 to be enrolled in two classes. The first included single men between the ages of 20 and 45 and married men between the ages of 20 and 35, while the second included married men between the ages of 35 and 45. The second class would only be called up after the first class had been exhausted.
    The Provost Marshal’s office, headquartered in Washington, was charged with administering the draft. Acting on orders from Provost Marshal General James Fry, a veteran of First Bull Run and Shiloh, conscription agents began going door to door in each congressional district during May and June 1863 to register all draft-eligible men. As federal agents, the provost marshals had broad powers to arrest and pursue draft evaders. Recent immigrants who had declared their intention to become citizens had 60 days to leave the country or become eligible to be drafted. African Americans, because they were not legally citizens, were not subject to conscription.
    Those men who were mentally or physically disabled, or who were the sole support of aged or widowed parents or orphaned children, were exempt from service. The bill’s most controversial provision allowed a draftee to escape service by providing a substitute or paying a $300 commutation fee. At a time when a New York laborer might make no more than $6 a week, paying a $300 commutation fee represented a financial impossibility. Attempts by some Republicans to justify the fee as a means of allowing businessmen to stay home and run production efforts vital to the Northern war effort rang hollow to most. The draft represented a dramatic departure from the American tradition of voluntary military service. “This law,” editorialized Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, “converts the Republic into one grand military dictatorship.”
    City Under Siege: The New York Draft Riots - Warfare History Network
     
  11. A-58

    A-58 Cool Dude

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    [​IMG]

    BY THEIR WORKS YOU WILL KNOW THEM

    Rev. Jones, Confederate Army Chaplain, recalls in his memoirs his first meeting with General Lee:

    “I can never forget my first interview and conversation with General Lee on religious matters. It was in February, 1864, while our army was. resting along the Rapidan, Rev. B. T. Lacy and myself went, as a committee of our Chaplains’ Association, to consult him in reference to the better observance of the Sabbath in the army, and especially to urge that something be done to prevent irreligious officers from converting Sunday into a grand gala day for inspections, reviews, etc.

    “It was a delicate mission. We did not wish to appear as either informers or officious inter-meddlers, and yet we were very anxious to do something to further the wishes of those who sent us, and to put a stop to what was then a growing evil and, in some commands, a serious obstacle to the efficient work of the chaplain.

    “The cordial greeting which he gave us, the marked courtesy and respect with which he listened to what we had to say, and expressed his warm sympathy with the object of our mission, soon put us at our ease. But as we presently began to answer his questions concerning the spiritual interests of the army, and to tell of that great revival which was then extending through the camps, and bringing thousands of our noble men to Christ, we saw his eye brighten and his whole countenance glow with pleasure; and as, in his simple, feeling words, he expressed his delight, we forgot the great warrior, and only remembered that we were communing with an humble, earnest Christian.”

    Travis [><]

    Source: CHRIST IN THE CAMP; RELIGION IN LEE’S ARMY, By Rev. J. Wm. Jones, 1888.
    Free E-book Link: https://play.google.com/books/reader…
    Photo: GENERAL LEE AS PRESIDENT OF WASHINGTON COLLEGE, NOW WASHINGTON AND LEE UNIVERSITY. (Lee Family Digital Archive)
     
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  12. TD-Tommy776

    TD-Tommy776 Man of Constant Sorrow

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    The NARA blog, The Unwritten Record has a post titled "Mapping the Battle of Shiloh". It has some nice hand drawn maps of the battle. Worth a look if you love maps.
     
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  13. GRW

    GRW Pillboxologist WW2|ORG Editor

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    "ARCHAEOLOGISTS have discovered a long lost mass grave of US Civil War soldiers in Mississippi.
    The collapse of a hill at the Vicksburg National Cemetery - a burial site for Union soldiers - in Mississippi led archaeologists to a shocking find. Buried deep below the now collapsed hill was the grave of 15 soldiers who had died during the US Civil War - which lasted from 1861-1865, when the Union of the North defeated the Confederates of the South.
    Experts state further DNA testing may be required to ensure that each soldier's remains are identified.
    According to a release from the Vicksburg National Military Park, the remains will be carefully removed and stored to ensure each set of the remains of each soldier are kept together"
    www.express.co.uk/news/science/1279655/archaeology-news-civil-war-discovery-Mississippi-archaeologist-cemetery

     

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